APHA releases statement: Decision to withdraw from climate agreement is a disaster for public health

APHA Executive Director Dr. Georges Benjamin has released a statement regarding President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.


Decision to withdraw from climate agreement is a disaster for public health

Statement from Georges Benjamin, MD, Executive Director, American Public Health Association

Washington, D.C., June 1, 2017 — “President Donald Trump’s decision today to renege on U.S. commitments to fighting climate change and withdraw from the Paris Agreement has disastrous consequences for human health.

“The climate accord, which establishes a long-term framework to reduce carbon emissions among more than 190 nations, marks a historic step toward addressing one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. As a leading emitter of greenhouse gases, U.S. participation and leadership is critical to reaching target global reductions and minimizing health threats.

“This administration has already taken significant steps to roll back progress we’ve made in addressing climate change. Today’s reckless decision is further abdication of leadership at the federal level to protect public health. But our work on climate change will not be stopped. Today’s announcement underscores the importance of continued action at the state and local level to address this threat.

“The science is clear. Climate change is happening and it’s affecting our health. A changing climate affects our food supply, the spread of infectious disease, our water systems and air quality, and much more. All have significant impacts on human health.

“We will continue our efforts to educate, advocate and mobilize action around this critical public health challenge. We have designated 2017 as the Year of Climate Change and Health and the APHA 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo will focus on climate change and health in November.”

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The American Public Health Association champions the health of all people and all communities. We strengthen the public health profession. We speak out for public health issues and policies backed by science. We are the only organization that influences federal policy, has a 145-year perspective and brings together members from all fields of public health. Visit www.apha.org.

For more information, please contact David Fouse, 202-777-2501.

 

New World Bank Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) – ‘From Climate Science to Action’ starting May 8, 2017

The World Bank Group is offering a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on climate change – ‘From Climate Science to Action’ – starting May 8th 2017.

The new course presents the most recent scientific evidence on climate change. It explores different strategies for low emission and climate resilient development, and provides an overview to the Paris Agreement ratification with some reflections on COP22 outcomes. Through interactive video talks, complimented with curated readings, resources and quizzes, renowned scientists and policy makers from the field will lead you through the course. An active discussion forum on the course would further enhance learning where participants get to exchange knowledge with peers from across the globe. As the course concludes, you will be invited to reflect on what you can do at the national, local, community, and individual level to limit global warming below 2°C and adapt the impacts already occurring.

You can audit video lectures and some course content for free. If you want to complete the course and earn a Course Certificate by submitting assignments for a grade, you can purchase the course for a small fee. Financial aid is available if you cannot afford the course fee.

Workload: 3-6 hours/ week

Register for this four week course here.

#D4CA Challenge: UN Global Pulse calls for research proposals to analyze business data to combat #climatechange

Note: This was cross-posted to my own blog.


Rose Schneider, chair of the IH Section’s Climate Change & Health Working Group, shared this information about the Data for Climate Action challenge. It’s an initiative by the UN’s Global Pulse to recruit researchers and data scientists to “leverage private big data to identify revolutionary new approaches to climate mitigation and adaptation” – that is, use corporate datasets, which have been de-identified and made available by participating companies, for projects or analyses that “generate innovative climate solutions.” According to the press release:

Data for Climate Action will target three areas relevant to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal on climate action (SDG 13): climate mitigation, climate adaptation, and the linkages between climate change and the broader 2030 Agenda.

The challenge aims to generate original research papers and tools that demonstrate how data-driven innovation can inform on-the-ground solutions and transform efforts to fight climate change. It builds upon the model of data science competitions pioneered by organizations like Kaggle, and company-specific initiatives to share big data for the public good, such as the “Data for Development” challenges hosted by Orange.

Researchers who are selected to participate in Data for Climate Action will have four months to conduct their research. A diverse panel of experts in climate change and data science will evaluate final submissions based on their methodology, relevance, and potential impact. Winners will be announced in November of 2017.

The data being offered includes retail transaction data, social media posts, meteorological and air quality data, and user-generated data on road conditions. Data sets can be combined with each other or with other publicly available datasets like those featured on Data is Plural. Individuals or teams can submit proposals, and the only apparent requirement is that all participants be at least 18 years old.

They’ve apparently extended the deadline from April 10th to the 17th, so any analysts or programmers who aspire to code for the public good still have ten days to get their applications together and apply.

Climate Justice Changes Health: Live Webinar on February 27th

The following message is from APHA’s environmental health team.


Climate Justice Changes Health

APHA has declared 2017 as the Year of Climate Change and Health. This very special kick-off webinar is being hosted by APHA, the Public Health Institute Center for Climate Change and Health, Island Press and Security & Sustainability Forum. During the webinar, you’ll hear from speakers who are engaged in the fight for climate justice and healthy communities, to explore how climate justice is the best strategy to address both climate change and health inequities here in the U.S. and around the world.

Date: February 27th, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EST

Moderators: 
Linda Rudolph, MD, MPH
Director, Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute

Surili Patel, MS
Senior Program Manager, Environmental Health APHA

Speakers: 
Jacqui Patterson, MSW, MPH
Director, Environmental and Climate Justice Program, NAACP

Patricia Cochran
Executive Director, Alaska Native Science Center

Renzo Guinto, MD
Healthy Energy Initiative, Health Care Without Harm, SE Asia

Lisa Hoyos
Director, Climate Parents

Amy Vanderwarker
Co-Director, California Environmental Justice Alliance

Please Register here!


Stay involved! Follow the conversation on social media using the hashtags #APHAwebinar and #ClimateChangesHealth. For more information on how climate change impacts health, please visit www.apha.org/climate.

Questions? Contact environment@apha.org.

Climate & Health Meeting: Live Webcast on February 16th

The following message is from APHA’s environmental health team.


The science on climate change and health is under attack. And we risk seeing the clock turned back decades.

That’s why APHA stepped up and joined forces with former Vice President Al Gore and others to host a meeting on Thursday Feb. 16 focused on climate change and health. We believe it is critical that climate change and other important public health issues receive the attention they deserve and that the drive toward solutions continues. Don’t miss your chance for a front row seat to the meeting via a live webcast!

The Climate & Health Meeting will bring together public health professionals, the climate community and others who are key to confronting and managing climate-related public health challenges.

View the live webcast

We hope to see you there! A recording will be available for any sessions you cannot view live.

Sincerely,

Surili Patel
Senior Program Manager – Environmental Health

Surili Sutaria Patel

Questions? Please contact our environmental health team or tweet us @EH_4_All.