Global News Round Up

Politics & Policies

Every year, the World Health Organization puts out a list of the most pressing issues that face global health.  They change a bit each time as the WHO tries to emphasize where we need the most progress to be made, and the lists are always enlightening.

Funding to tackle 33 significant diseases has reached its highest level since figures were taken, says a survey which has tracked this for 11 years.

Programs, Grants & Awards

The health of the U.S. population can be affected by public health threats or events across the globe. Recent examples of this include the Ebola Virus outbreak that began in 2014, the 2003 SARS epidemic, and the 2009 SARS epidemic, and the 2009 spread of novel H1N1 influenza. Improving global health can improve health in the United States and support national and global security interests by fostering political stability, diplomacy, and economic growth worldwide.

Research

Results from trials of tafenoquine, a novel anti-relapse medicine for patients infected with Plasmodium vivax malaria, have shown the drug to be effective and safe, according to a pair of studies published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Diseases & Disasters

There were just 28 reported human cases of Guinea worm disease (GWD) last year, the U.S.-based Carter Center said Thursday.  The nongovernmental organization (NGO) founded by former President Jimmy Carter said the disease is gradually moving toward eradication.

A Pakistani health official says the country has kicked off its first nationwide polio vaccination campaign for the year in efforts to eradicate the crippling disease by the end of 2019.

According to the World Health Organization, the first HIV case appeared in Yemen in 1987, and the number of people living with it was estimated to be around 9,900.  While the prevalence was only 0.2 percent of the population, most Yemenis living with either of the viruses faced stigma and discrimination, even from their families.

At least 11 people have died in Argentina after becoming infected with hantavirus, a disease carried by rats and other rodents, according to a news alert from the World Health Organization (WHO).

The number of Ebola cases recorded each day in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is expected to more than double, with concern mounting that uncertainty over how the virus is being transmitted could result in it spreading to neighbouring countries.

An estimated 1 in 10,000 people are born with hemophilia, a blood disorder caused by lack of proteins needed to stop bleeding. While those in developed countries have access to treatment that allows them to lead normal lives, that is not the case for the more than half a million people in low- and middle-income countries. For them, hemophilia can be a “curse,” a cause for stigma and financial disaster—and, sometimes, a death sentence.

Technology

Solar power is helping make universal healthcare a reality in places where unreliable power supplies regularly affect access to vital services, and can out people’s lives at risk, thanks to support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Environmental Health

Leading climate scientists and meteorologists are banking on a new strategy for talking about climate change: Take the politics out of it.  That means avoiding the phrase “climate change,” so loaded with partisan connotations as it is.

Dried fish producers in Cox’s Bazar’s Nazirar Tek village, the largest dried fish producing village in the country, are still using toxins even though an NGO has been putting in efforts to make them switch to organic fish-processing methods.

This weekend, a crucial but barely heralded scientific mission will come to an end in a remote part of Antarctica.  A team of seven Australian and American researchers will conduct the last extraction of ancient air from ice cores drilled as deep as 240 metres.

Equity & Disparities

For her next act, Leland started a venture — called Co-Impact — designed for just such funders. It pools donors’ money and brings them into the decision-making to support proven solutions in Africa, South Asia and South America.

Women, Maternal, Neonatal & Children’s Health

For Indian airline executive ElsaMarie D’Silva, the gang rape that killed a Delhi college student in 2012 was a turning point.  Although the attack stood out for its savagery, D’Silva knew that the rape of Jyoti Singh Pandey was not an isolated event: it fit a pattern of everyday harassment and violence that Indian women endure in public places.

The mosquito-borne virus that causes Rift Valley fever may severely injure human fetuses if contracted by mothers during pregnancy, according to new research.

Read the latest issue of the IH newsletter, Section Connection!

The latest issue of Section Connection, the IH Section quarterly e-newsletter, is now available! You can find the latest issue of the newsletter here: http://bit.ly/SectionConnection10

If you cannot access the newsletter for any reason please email Theresa Majeski, Global Health Connections Chair, at theresa.majeski@gmail.com

Call for abstract reviewers open for this year’s Annual Meeting!

As you all know, the call for abstracts is now open for APHA’s Annual Meeting in Philadelphia (https://apha.confex.com/apha/2019/ih.htm). The IH Section is fortunate enough to receive hundreds of high-quality abstract submissions from its members, which gives us the opportunity to put together an engaging scientific program for our meeting attendees each year. A crucial part of that process is abstract review.

We encourage you to volunteer as a reviewer! The Program Committee needs 150-200 volunteers to review and score abstract submissions. Each volunteer is assigned a handful of abstracts (usually 10-20) to grade according to criteria set by APHA, using an online form.

You can sign up to review at:

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2019/ih/cfr.cgi

Reviewer sign-ups are open until February 1.

NOTE: You CAN STILL review abstracts EVEN IF you submitted one for consideration.

The deadline for abstract submissions is February 22. After the submission period closes, the Program Committee will allocate the abstracts to reviewers at the beginning of March. Volunteers will have three weeks to complete their reviews.

Please consider volunteering for this important task! You can sign up at:

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2019/ih/cfr.cgi

The deadline to sign up as a reviewer is February 1.

Call for Proposals: Health and Climate Solutions due 2/8

Posted on behalf of the Climate Change and Health Working Group
———————————
 Application Deadline: February 08, 2019, 3:00 p.m. ET

Purpose

Through this funding opportunity, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) seeks to develop and amplify the evidence around a set of approaches that improve community health and well-being and advance health equity, while also addressing climate change adaptation or mitigation. Eligible, local approaches can focus on one or more of a range of determinants of health—including, but not limited to: air quality; energy sources; transportation or mobility design; food and water systems; housing; and health systems. Proposals should specify the determinants of health that the given approach is addressing, and the expected impact on health and well-being. Grant funds will support research and evaluation activities to develop the best possible evidence highlighting what is working well with the select approach and why; where there have been opportunities and challenges; and how other communities may learn from this approach to tackle similar challenges. *All interventions eligible for this funding must have been implemented and active for at least one year as of the date of the application.

Eligibility and Selection Criteria

·      Proposals must discuss approaches focused in one or more geographically defined communities.
·      The community or organization implementing the approaches to address the health impacts of climate change, while improving health equity, must serve as the primary applicant (Project Director), and will be the prime recipient of funds. Individuals from collaborating organizations (e.g. research partner) can serve as the co-Project Director.
·      Eligible applicant organizations include public and private nonprofit organizations, federally or state-recognized Indian tribal governments, indigenous organizations, local government, and academic institutions.
·      Preference will be given to applicant organizations that are either public entities or nonprofit organizations that are tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and are not private foundations or Type III supporting organizations. The Foundation may require additional documentation.
·      Applicant organizations must be based in the United States or its territories.
·      Only one proposal may be submitted per applicant organization.

RWJF encourages applicant organizations representing diverse geographic areas, first time-applicants, and communities that are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change to apply.

Key Dates

Monday, January 7, 2019 (3:00 – 4:30 p.m. ET)
The first of two optional applicant webinars to provide an overview of the program and an opportunity to ask questions that are general in nature. The second webinar (see below) will be a repeat of the first. Registration is required; please register here for the January 7th webinar.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019 (8:00 – 9:30 p.m. ET)
A repeat of the first optional applicant webinar to provide an overview of the program and an opportunity to ask questions that are general in nature. Registration is required; please register here for the January 15th webinar.

February 8, 2019 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of brief proposals.

March 6, 2019
Selection of semi-finalists; notification of invitations to submit full proposals.

April 3, 2019 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of full proposals.

May 2, 2019
Selection of finalists; notification of invitation to participate in a site visit interview.

May 6, 2019 – May 20, 2019
Site visits conducted.

May 31, 2019
Selection of recommended grants; notification of decisions.

July 15, 2019
Approximate grant start date.

Total Awards
·      Up to eight awards will be made through this funding opportunity.
·      Proposals may request a budget of up to and including $350,000 each, for a project duration of up to and including 24 months.
·      Grant funds will support only research and evaluation activities and some communication and dissemination efforts; funds may not be used to develop or implement a new intervention, program, or approach.

For more information and to apply:
https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/funding-opportunities/2018/health-and-climate-solutions-hub.html

Preparing for the Health Effects of Drought: California Climate Action Team Public Health Workgroup Meeting on 2/4

Event Date & Time:

Monday, February 4, 2019 – 10:00am to 4:00pm

Pacific Time

CalEPA Headquarters, Sacramento, CA

Please join the California Department of Public Health, the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) for a workshop on Preparing for the Health Effects of Drought: A Workshop for Public Health Professionals and Partners. This workshop is hosted by the California Department of Public Health as part of the California Climate Action Team Public Health Workgroup meeting series and will take place at the CalEPA headquarters in Sacramento, CA with webinar participation available.

The morning session will be an informational and educational session for public health professionals on the health impacts of drought, and drought projections, with a focus on California. The afternoon will be a facilitated session by NDMC to help participants better understand and use a new CDC National Center for Environmental Health resource guide called Preparing for the Health Effects of Drought: A Resource Guide for Public Health Professionals.

Local health department staff and partners are particularly encouraged to attend, to hear tips and lessons learned from California health departments that have responded to severe drought.

The entire workshop will be shared via webinar, but we encourage in person participation, when possible, to get the most out of the facilitated learning.

Agenda (draft) available here: https://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/ab32publichealth/meetings/meetings.htm

Register to attend here: https://cpaess.ucar.edu/forms/preparing-health-effects-drought-california-2019

Webex webinar option – register by clicking herehttps://cdph-conf.webex.com/cdph-conf/onstage/g.php?MTID=ef6d7ecb278ccd899bf962522b9c8b926

For more details, please contact: Amanda Sheffield (amsheffield@ucsd.edu)or Dan Woo (daniel.woo@cdph.ca.gov).