March with public health workers to end unjust deportations, detentions, and border policies – November 5th at 10 AM in Philadelphia

PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS WILL NOT BE SILENT
NO DEPORTATIONS, NO DETENTIONS, NO BORDERS

Tuesday, November 5 at 10 AM in Philadelphia

March from the Convention Center to ICE Headquarters
Start at Cherry and 11th St., March to 114 N. 8 St.

We are outraged!! Millions are outraged!!! Immigrant children imprisoned, families separated, deaths in detention. Why? Because millions in Central America and elsewhere are living in poverty, displaced by climate disasters, and beset by government tolerated or instigated violence, most of which is caused by the US and other “advanced” nations.

And it keeps getting worse. Trump wants to demand that all migrants seek asylum in the first country they cross and that only those who are self-supporting be admitted. Fewer than ever asylum applications are being granted – only 38.2% in 2017. New Sanctuary in New York City reports only one successful case in the last 20 applicants who appeared without lawyers.

  • Now there are over 200 immigrant prisons, 60% of which are private
  • Over 42,000 people in custody each day on average in 2018
  • At least 2654 children separated from their parents before June, 2018
  • As of June 2019, over 2000 children without parents in ICE custody each week
  • 24 immigrants have died in custody since Trump took office through June 2019, including seven children

As we gather here in Philadelphia to consider how to better the public’s health, we must not allow ICE to lurk unnoticed just a few blocks away. This attack on immigrants is an aspect of growing fascism, which includes racist police killings, mass incarceration, attacks on unions, growing homelessness and inequality, deteriorating schools and health facilities, and the ever increasing threat of war and climate change.

We must fight back on all fronts by building multiracial unity between professionals, students, workers and soldiers, in the US and everywhere.

CBPHC Pre-Conference – How to Achieve Real Social Change: Opportunities and Challenges for Effective Collaboration and Partnership in Community Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC), 11/2

Community Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) Pre-Conference:
How to Achieve Real Social Change: Opportunities and Challenges for Effective Collaboration and Partnership in Community Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC)

November 2nd from 8 AM to 5 PM
Pennsylvania Convention Center, 1101 Arch Street, Room# 120B

Are you interested in best practices for collaboration and effective partnership for social change in global health?

The CBPHC Pre-Conference is an opportunity participate with international and national experts, CHWs, program planners, policy-makers, CHW advocates, donors, and others interested in CBPHC to define effective partnering practices and collaboration strategies that support CBPHC and social change.

Dr. Carl Taylor, CBPHC pioneer, wrote in his last publication, “Real social change occurs when officials and people with relevant knowledge and resources come together with communities in joint action around mutual priorities.” Effective CBPHC is grounded in collaboration and partnering practices to achieve social change.

Last year, the Astana Declaration at the Global Conference on Primary Health Care re-affirmed the critical role that primary health care (PHC) plays to ensure that everyone everywhere is able to enjoy the highest standard of health (WHO, 2018). While PHC approach is a foundational building block for Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and reaching health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), achieving these stretch goals requires effective partnerships and collaboration in global practice.

This pre-conference sponsored by the Community-Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) working group of the International Health Section will explore the role partnering practices play in global health. We will address the challenges inherent in diverse partnerships including power imbalances and potential tensions between community, donors, government, individuals, civil society, NGOs and universities. This participatory workshop will bring together international and national experts, CHWs, program planners, policy-makers, CHW advocates, donors, and others interested in CBPHC to define effective partnering practices and collaboration strategies that support CBPHC and social change.

Workshop Objectives:
1) Describe how four-way partnerships for sustainability function effectively to achieve universal health coverage (including the roles community, government, donors, and civil society, NGOs and Universities play)
2) Describe the potential tensions and power-privilege dynamics in diverse partnerships
3) Explain elements of effective partnering practices that support equitable collaboration

Keynotes include:

“An Ethical Lens on Collaboration in Global Practice” Dr. Jim Lavery, the Hilton Chair for Global Ethics, of Emory University
“Tools for Creating and Measuring Collaboration Globally” Dr. Nina Wallerstein, Director of the UNM Center for Participatory Research

You will be able to participate in working group discussions, and share your best practices for global health and collaboration! Cost of the workshop is $25 for students, and $35 for non-students!

TO REGISTER: Go to APHA Annual Meeting Workshops or register at APHA EventBrite

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Email the CBPHC Working Group at cbphcworkgroup@gmail.com

Hope you can come!

Laura Chanchien Parajon, MD, MPH
Chair of the CBPHC Working Group

Global News Round Up

Politics & Policies

Health care can shift so that organizations across borders collaborate to help solve health care problems. Organizations can better solve problems related to access to care, research, training and development if they work together, not competitively.

It was the ambitious sanitation campaign aimed at giving almost half of India’s 1.3 billion population access to a toilet in just five years.  And last week, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi finally declared India free of open defecation.

Bill Gates told an audience at the University of Cambridge that global malnutrition will be solved and malaria will be virtually eliminated by 2040 if world leaders choose to fund scientific innovation.

During a meeting of heads of State, ministers, health leaders, policy-makers, and universal health coverage champions, the UN chief called UHC “the most comprehensive agreement ever reached on global health – a vision for Universal Health Coverage by 2030”

Programs, Grants & Awards

NEST360° is announcing $68 million in funding commitments from a consortium, including some of the world’s largest private foundations, for the first phase of an eight-year initiative to enable African hospitals to improve newborn survival by 50 percent and to establish a pipeline of local innovators, technicians and medical staff. 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded 10 grants this year to UC San Francisco researchers as part of the NIH Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative. The awards to UCSF total more than $40 million and will fund projects ranging from better technologies for MRI imaging of back pain, to the use of deep-brain stimulation for treating chronic pain, to a new interdisciplinary research center for low back pain.

Research

In a new study, UC San Francisco scientists used maps of brain connections to predict how brain atrophy would spread in individual patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), adding to growing evidence that the loss of brain cells associated with dementia spreads via the synaptic connections between established brain networks.

In animals, infections are fought by the immune system. Studies on an unusual virus infecting wild koalas reveal a new form of ‘genome immunity.’

Diseases & Disasters

If you visited the Philadelphia International Airport earlier this month, you may have been exposed to measles. The Pennsylvania Department of Health warned the public on Friday that anyone who visited the airport on October 2 and 3 could have contracted the viral infection.

Ebola in the DRC has been corralled into a much smaller geographical area—27 zones, compared to 207 at the outbreak’s peak, the WHO’s Michael Ryan told reporters.

Kenya is seeing more and more addicts. The number of people injecting drugs jumped by more than 50% in the past eight years and the majority of users inject heroin, the health ministry says.

The World Health Organization is meeting in the Philippines after the country announced an outbreak of polio.  Environmental samples from sewage in Manila have been confirmed as containing the virus.

The United States remains committed to fighting Ebola in Africa, American health officials said, but the scope of the current outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become somewhat unclear.

Technology 

An ingestible sensor that allows doctors to remotely monitor tuberculosis patients’ intake of medication has the potential to save millions of lives and revolutionise treatment for the world’s most deadly infectious disease, researchers said.

Environmental Health

Climate change poses a huge threat to global health and is likely to trigger mass migration, food and water shortages and the spread of infectious diseases, experts have warned.

Pregnant women’s exposure to extreme heat raises their risk of being hospitalized, according to a new working paper distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research — and black women, as in other pregnancy outcomes, appear to be more severely impacted than white women. What’s more, greater exposure to extreme heat can increase a newborn’s likelihood of a dehydration diagnosis and subsequent chances of returning to the hospital within the first year of life, the study found, for diagnoses including respiratory diseases and prenatal jaundice. 

Equity & Disparities

Narendra Modi is to declare that his flagship sanitation programme has ended open defecation in India, amid accusations that the scheme has sparked violence and abuse.

Six young women went to the U.N. to present a document that has no precedent: a Global Girls’ Bill of Rights.

Hundreds of thousands of healthcare facilities in low- and middle- income countries is deplorable. Take into account that this data includes developed countries. Worldwide, 1/4 lack basic water services and 1/5 lack adequate sanitation services, leaving 2 billion people without access to safe, affordable surgical care.

Foundations and nonprofits committed a new and substantial $120 million for global health at a convening in Washington, D.C., this past summer. The pledges of support focus on an urgent challenge across developing countries that doesn’t get much attention: ensuring safe water and sanitation at hospitals and health clinics around the world. 

Women, Maternal, Neonatal & Children’s Health

In 2015, Zika virus swept through Brazil and the Americas. In the three years since it ended, the pandemic has become an object of obsession for scientists, who have published more than 6,000 research papers about it. Researchers have been able to follow long-term health consequences in children infected with the virus before birth. 

Women represent 70% of the global health workforce but hold only 25% of the senior roles, according to World Health Organization. Amika George and Flaviana Matata talk about how their organizations are helping women have control over their bodies and their futures. 

Researchers from Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar and Nigeria, sent trained observers to three urban hospitals in each country to watch pregnant women from the time they were admitted until two hours after delivery. They found that of 2,016 women directly observed, 838 (41.6%) experienced physical or verbal abuse.

Have you read the latest issue of our newsletter, Section Connection?

The latest issue of Section Connection, the IH Section e-newsletter, is now available!

You can find the latest issue of the newsletter here: 

http://bit.ly/SectionConnection12

In this edition, you will hear more about the different Annual Meeting events our section hosts; learn more about our Student Committee; and get up close and personal with IH section member – Dr. Idong Essiet-Gibson. We will share updates from the Global Health Mentoring Committee, the Climate Change and Health Working Group, the Communications Committee and Social Media Subcommittee, the Systems Science for Health Systems Strengthening Working Group and the Community Based Primary Healthcare Working Group.

We hope you continue to stay connected and involved with our section. See you in November in Philadelphia!

Global News Round Up

Politics & Policies

A new study by WHO, published in Lancet Global Health, found that investing $6 billion per year in eliminating hepatitis in 67 low- and middle-income countries would avert 4.5 million premature deaths by 2030, and more than 26 million deaths beyond that target date.

There isn’t a single country in the world with 100 per cent universal health coverage. All global health systems have room to improve. But UHC as it has been held up as a UN goal leaves much to be desired.

A new KFF online resource tracks more than 30 bills introduced in the current Congress that would affect global health policy.

Programs, Grants & Awards

The United States government announced US$45 million in funding to respond to the critical food security situation in the upcoming lean season between October 2019 and March 2020 in Zimbabwe.

There is a great deal of institutional interest among health professions students in joining global health programs, with more than 25% having participated during their training. However, when programs rely on short-term fixes to long-standing infrastructure and resource deficits, some of the world’s most vulnerable, poor patients can be exploited.

European University Alliance for Global Health has been launched with a press conference in Paris. Part of the European Universities alliances receiving funding by the EU Commission to collaborate across borders, the network is composed of five international partners.

Research

Visceral leishmaniasis infects an estimated 300,000 people annually and causes 20,000 deaths every year, according to the World Health Organization.

The World Health Organization (WHO) considers antimicrobial resistance to be one of the 10 threats to global health in 2019. 

Malaria, one of the world’s leading killers, could be eradicated as early as 2050, according to a new report published by The Lancet Commission on malaria eradication.

Diseases & Disasters

Measles is proving fatal at an alarming rate, far faster than Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

The Bangladeshi government has confirmed another five deaths from dengue fever, bringing the total number of fatalities in the country since January to 23, the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) reported Tuesday.

Malaria has killed more than 1,800 people in Burundi this year, the UN’s humanitarian agency says, a death toll rivalling a deadly Ebola outbreak in neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo.

Obesity is a growing problem in many countries around the world. Obesity is reaching further into Mexico and costing their citizens and healthcare system millions of dollars.

Technology 

It is hard to get much of a reputation if nobody knows you’re around, and that has definitely been the case for mycoplasma genitalium, the tiny bacteria estimated to be more prevalent than the bug that causes gonorrhea but is almost completely off the public’s radar.

Technology designed to intercept online extremism is being deployed to tackle vaccine misinformation.

Environmental Health

Common ingredients in the cleaning sprays for your kitchen and bathroom make mice less fertile, suggesting the compounds could do the same to humans, according to a new study.

Ocean heat waves, which can push out fish, plankton and other aquatic life, are happening far more frequently than previously thought, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The climate crisis represents the biggest threat to the future of global health over the next quarter of a century, according to a survey of top medical professionals.

 

Equity & Disparities

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has published a report, Examining Inequality, on how the world is doing. In short, it’s not great. It’s even worse if you are a girl.

The darkening clouds are ominous for many in this urban neighborhood in Kampala, promising rushing rainwaters stinking of human waste from overflowing septic tanks.

 

Women, Maternal, Neonatal & Children’s Health

UNICEF and the World Food Programme provide food and nutrition aid to North Korean children—but a lack of funds, fueled by political tension and the US-led strategy of pressure and isolation of North Korea, have limited their reach.

New Zealand’s government announced that it plans changes to the country’s abortion laws that would treat the procedure as a health issue rather than a crime.