Nominate your colleagues for an IH Section Award, Deadline June 6th

Dear APHA International Health Section members,

It is time again to solicit your nominations for awards to be presented at the next annual APHA convention, this October 24-27, 2021, in Denver, Colorado, and online. The deadline for submission of nominations is Sunday, June 6, 2021, 11:59 p.m. (Pacific Daylight Time). This is how we can recognize our colleagues who have made significant contributions to international health and our Section. The IH Section has five award categories, descriptions and award criteria being described below:

1. Carl Taylor Lifetime Achievement Award in International Health
2. Gordon-Wyon Award for Community-Oriented Public Health, Epidemiology and Practice
3. Mid-Career Award in International Health
4. Distinguished Section Service Award
5. Young Professional Award

We encourage you to think about who in APHA and our Section might merit public recognition through an award. It really doesn’t take a long time to nominate someone. We ask for only a page or so that describes how the nominee meets the award criteria, plus the C.V. of the proposed awardee. If you have an idea of someone who might merit an award and desire some feedback, or need to verify whether they are APHA or IH Section members, please contact us at ihsection.awards@gmail.com  

Instructions for submitting nominations are found below. You can also access the award descriptions and criteria, along with the names of past awardees as compiled by IH Historian Ray Martin, on the IH website, https://aphaih.org/ih-section-awards-2/

The IH Section Awards Committee consists of Jean Armas, Paul Freeman, Omar Khan, Ray Martin, Henry Perry, Hallie Pritchard, Gopal Sankaran, Rose Schneider, Sarah Shannon, Curtiss Swezy, Laura Altobelli, and Mini Murthy, IH Section Chair ex officio.

Sincerely,


Laura Altobelli, IH Awards Committee Chair
American Public Health Association
International Health Section

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Annual Awards Guidance

The International Health (IH) Section recognizes each year outstanding individuals who have contributed in an important way to the field of international health and/or to the IH Section. Guidance is provided here on the process and criteria for selecting the individuals to receive the five major awards:


Carl Taylor Lifetime Achievement Award,
Gordon-Wyon Award for Community-Oriented Public Health, Epidemiology, and Practice,
Mid-Career Award in International Health,
Distinguished Section Service Award,
Young Professional Award

A. Process for award nominations and selection

The Awards Committee of the IH Section is entrusted with the awards process, with collaboration and input from IH Section leadership when needed.


The annual request for nominations for IH Section awards is prepared by the IH Section Awards Committee. This request is sent out to all IH Section members on multiple virtual platforms managed by the IH Section Communications Committee.

A nomination can be made by submitting to ihsection.awards@gmail.com two items: (1) a letter of nomination of no more than two pages that specifies the name of the nominee, the title of the award, and how the nominee meets the specific criteria for the award (listed below); and (2) the nominee’s current curriculum vitae.

All complete nominations are reviewed by the IH Section Awards Committee. The committee members then vote independently on the candidates. The nominee who gets the highest number of votes in the award category is selected to receive the award.

Awardees are honored at the following Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA).

B. Awards Criteria

Carl Taylor Lifetime Achievement Award in International Health
The Carl Taylor Lifetime Achievement Award in International Health honors the visionaries and leaders who have shaped or continue to shape the direction of International Health. Carl E. Taylor was the founder of the APHA International Health Section and a pioneer in and global champion of international health in the 20th century. The evaluation criteria for the Lifetime Achievement Award include: (1) Quality, creativity, and innovativeness of the individual’s contributions to the field of international health; (2) Application of the individual’s work to international health practice (as opposed to primarily theoretical value); (3) The individual’s contributions as a leader, visionary, and role model in international health; and (4) Current membership in APHA, and preferably membership in the IH Section.

Gordon-Wyon Award for Community-Oriented Public Health, Epidemiology, and Practice
The Gordon-Wyon Award for Community-Oriented Public Health, Epidemiology, and Practice recognizes outstanding achievement in international community-oriented public health, epidemiology, and/or practice. This award was established in 2006 by the IH Section. John Gordon and John Wyon were pioneer epidemiologists and mentors in this field, so encouraging and recognizing others in this field is one important way of remembering and honoring them. The evaluation criteria include: (1) Outstanding achievement in international community-oriented public health, epidemiology, and/or practice; (2) Demonstrated creativity in expanding the concepts pertinent to the practice of international community-oriented public health; and (3) Current membership in the APHA IH Section.

Mid-Career Award in International Health
The Mid-Career Award in International Health recognizes an outstanding mid-career professional in the IH Section. Evaluation criteria include: (1) Demonstrated achievement and commitment to international health promotion and development over a suggested period of seven to 20 years; (2) Demonstrated creativity in expanding the concepts pertinent to the practice of public health with an international focus; and (3) Current membership in the APHA IH Section.

Distinguished Section Service Award
The Distinguished Section Service Award honors outstanding service to the IH Section. The evaluation criteria include: (1) Dedication to the IH Section mission and goals as demonstrated by exceptional contribution to its activities; (2) Serving in IH Section elected positions or chairing its committees with outstanding or unusual effort and achievements; (3) Excellence in team work with peers in the IH Section and the APHA; and (4) Current membership in the APHA IH Section.

Young Professional Award
The International Health Section recognizes the important contribution of young professionals for their leadership, innovation, and demonstrated contribution to international health with its annual Young Professional Award instituted in 2018. The evaluation criteria include: (1) Demonstrated contribution to the field of international health through leadership, innovation, and impactful practice; (2) Age younger than 35 years at the time of application; and (3) Current membership in the APHA IH Section.


– Updated and approved by the IH Section Awards Committee, April 2021

Public health professionals condemn threats to health for Palestinians

By Cindy Sousa, International Health Section

The Palestine Health Justice Working Group, a committee of the American Public Health Association’s International Health (APHA-IH) Section, issued a statement last week focused on health justice for Palestinians. In it, they went beyond calling for a cease-fire to condemning ongoing settler-colonial violence and oppression by the Israeli government against Palestinians. The statement launched on Wednesday, May 19. Within 24 hours, they had 350 signatures from public health professionals across the globe (public health workers, social workers, physicians, nurses, medical students, and researchers, among others). By Saturday, May 22, this number had risen to 500 supporters.

To read the full text of their statement and to sign on: click here.

Pharmacy and Entrance to UNRWA Nuseirat Health Clinic, Gaza Strip, 2015. Photo by Ron J Smith.

Over the past month, Palestinians have seen spiraling violence at the hands of Israeli military forces, police, and private mobs. But the attacks of last week – following Palestinian resistance to the eviction of Palestinians in the neighborhood of Shiekh Jarrah by Israelis – were the worst in years. Between May 10 and May 21, the Israeli military killed at least 230 Palestinians in Gaza, including 66 children; injured almost 2,000; and temporarily displaced more than 77,000. In the West Bank, Israeli forces killed 27 Palestinians and injured 6,794 more. Israel destroyed or damaged six hospitals and nine healthcare centers in Gaza, including a clinic that housed its only coronavirus testing lab, and killed two of the most prominent physicians in Gaza: Dr Ayman Abu Auf, head of the internal medicine department and Coronavirus response at Gaza’s largest hospital al-Shifa and Dr. Mo’in Ahmad al-Aloul, one of the few neurologists in Gaza.

The violence has taken an extreme toll on Palestinians, a community already suffering from hostility, such that on April 27 of this year, Human Rights Watch released a report condemning Israeli authorities for “crimes of apartheid and persecution.” Israel has undermined Palestine’s public health system for decades, through blockades and direct attacks. These efforts have undermined efforts at containing COVID 19.   Vaccine access disparity reached such a critical point that many described it as institutionalized discrimination and as medical apartheid. These practices are especially damaging when viewed within the framework of ongoing occupation and deliberate gutting of the Palestinian health-sector under Israeli settler-colonial rule. On this point, Osama Tanous, a pediatrician and volunteer with the mobile clinic of Physicians for Human Rights-Israel in Gaza, described the larger context of the most recent attacks on Gaza, pointing out, “Healthcare infrastructure in Gaza was already heavily damaged by decades of Israeli de-development and siege. Now it has suffered additional, direct attacks on facilities and workforce.”

While the group was heartened last week by the news of cease-fire, their statement called for more, including independent investigations into the short- and long-term physical and mental health implications of the actions of the Israeli government. They are especially concerned about ongoing attacks on civilians, healthcare, and healthcare workers, which are in clear violation of international law and the ethics of public health. Palestine Health Justice Working Group also emphasizes that their statement – like their ongoing work – is not just about the most recent events, but about decades of violence and oppression against Palestinians. Group co-chair and global health scholar Yara Asi, asserted, “While our statement addressed the immediate need for a lasting ceasefire, this statement goes further, to situate the violence in its historical context. The public health community is very much seeing the need to act on our professional ethics to promote ongoing justice in Palestine and Israel – not just for this week, but for the long-term.”

Regarding the need to situate the violence of last week within a larger context, last week human rights experts from the United Nations called for an International Criminal Court investigation into not only the most recent Israeli attacks against civilians and healthcare facilities, but also wide-spread evictions and illegal transfer of Palestinians by Israelis, along with the ongoing constraints on Palestinian housing, education, and freedom of movement.

In support of the statement, Mads Gilbert, a Norwegian physician trained in emergency medicine who has been working with Palestinian doctors for four decades, said, “I’m a medical doctor. I’m trained to treat root causes of suffering, not just symptoms. The Israeli occupation, colonization of Palestine, and brutal apartheid that underlies the health crisis in Palestine must end.”

The majority of signatories are from the United States, with others signing from the UK, Egypt, Canada, Spain, Israel, and Palestine. Dr. Yasser Abu-Jamei, a psychiatrist in Palestine and head of the Gaza Community Mental Health Program, said, “This statement sends a positive message to all supporters of the Palestinian struggle. We see justice getting closer and closer. No matter how difficult life is for us now, our dignity and our rights to health and to freedom are increasingly recognized, in this case, as the statement demonstrates, by a growing public health community concerned with justice for Palestine.”

The statement by the APHA-IH working group joins with at least four other statements issued by health professionals aimed at addressing not only immediate fatalities, but also the health harms of the ongoing Israeli settler-colonial project in Palestine. Statements were also issued by People’s Health Movement; Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP) Health Advisory Council; Equal Health’s Campaign Against Racism; and a group of Canadian Health Workers. Other professional groups have issued calls, including a wide-ranging group of scholars; The National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA); Middle East Studies Association; the Middle East Section of the American Anthropological Association; and others.

Rachel Rubin, another co-chair of the Palestine Health Justice Working Group, who is also on the steering committee for the JVP Health Advisory Council, notes, “What we have seen this May is an increasingly urgent insistence that justice in Palestine is a compelling health issue, one that requires us to act on our ethical imperatives to promote freedom and oppose all forms of violence including settler-colonial control of Palestine.”

It was exactly this sentiment that led to the formation of APHA’s International Health Section Palestine Health Justice Working Group several years ago. The working group began as a network formed within the International Health Section to pass an APHA policy statement on the health harms of Israeli settler-colonial violence and oppression in Palestine. Serving as a forum for interaction, support, information exchange, and activism, the group works to raise consciousness about the issue among APHA members and other health professionals – through education at the APHA annual meeting and other venues, and through promoting the work and leadership of Palestinian health professionals.

As an organized body within APHA focused on health justice in Palestine, The Palestine Health Justice Working Group works not only externally, but also within APHA to pressure the organization to use our collective voice, as one of the leading global public health organizations, to voice opposition to Israel’s continual assaults on Palestinian health and freedom, as APHA has in contexts of Iran (#277718), Iraq (#200617), South Africa (#9122), Nicaragua (#8306), Yemen (LB19-13), and other locations.

The group’s statement aligns with several APHA resolutions, which have held that the prevention of genocide (#200030), the health effects of militarism (#8531), the health of refugees (#8531), law enforcement violence (#201811), attacks on healthcare workers (#201910), and health within armed conflict and war (#20095) are public health matters deserving of our attention and action. The statement also pushes APHA itself, as the Governing Council has–in four separate attempts (2008, 2009, 2012 and 2013)–failed to pass proposed resolutions expressing concern about how the Israeli occupation has undermined the health of Palestinians.

Site of the Wafa Rehabilitation Hospital, Gaza Strip. Destroyed in Israeli bombing raid July 23rd, 2014. Photo by Ron J Smith.

“People’s views are changing,” says Amy Hagopian, long-time section member and 2018 recipient of the section’s Victor Sidel and Barry Levy Award for Peace, who co-authored these resolutions, “APHA members are beginning to see through the rhetorical devices used to shut down debate on Palestine. This topic scares people because they think it’s too complicated, or they don’t want to be accused of being anti-Semitic, or the don’t see the connection to public health.  Maybe the meaningful conversation about Black Lives and police violence in the U.S. over the last year has helped people connect some dots. The widespread support for this statement – and others like it – demonstrate that APHA could have this conversation in a respectful way, and step up to advocate for health justice for Palestinians.”  

To get involved, people can join our Palestine Health Justice Working Group meetings at APHA’s annual meeting each year, or send a message to apha-palestine-health-justice-working-group@googlegroups.com. Please be sure to attend their invited session at APHA’s 2021 Annual Meeting: Sovereignty as a core determinant of health: The imperative for both social connection and independence, as well as other sessions that will be held on Palestinian health justice.

The latest Section Connection newsletter is here!

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are proud to share with you the latest issue of our newsletter, Section Connection. In this issue, you will hear from two of our members on their global health perspectives and journeys; get up close and personal with IH section member – Mara Howard-Williams; dive into a little bit of the section’s history; and hear about the work that the program committee does.

We will also share updates from our members, hear about our section’s activities, and learn what our various committee and working groups have been up to.

Please click here to access our latest issue of Section Connection: http://bit.ly/SectionConnection15

We hope you continue to stay connected and involved with our section,
Jean Armas, Heather de Vries McClintock, and Sarah Edmonds
The IH Section Communications Team

PS Don’t forget to submit your abstract by March 21st for this year’s Annual Meeting!

Trade, Health, and Access to the COVID Vaccines

By: Mary Anne Mercer, IH Section representative in the Trade and Health Forum

The International Health Section is part of the Trade and Health Forum, an intersectional group that aims to inform and activate members on how various aspects of trade affects health, both at home and in the rest of the world. That topic is a bit of a mystery to most of us. But as globalization becomes ever more evident, the relevance of its effects on health is more obvious.

Take the COVID-19 pandemic, for example.  If there is one key lesson to be learned from this past year, it’s that we will only be able to crush the pandemic here when it can be done everywhere. And an important strategy to making that happen is to step up access to the new vaccines as quickly and as widely as possible.  “Herd immunity” can only be reached safely by massive levels of immunizations.

 Right now the 84% of the world’s population that lives in low and middle-income countries is at a huge disadvantage because of rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO) constraining the development of generic drugs and vaccines. Those of us who were involved in the early response to AIDS in Africa see eerie parallels with that time. The first drugs to treat AIDS were too costly for low-income countries to adopt. I worked with a health program in Mozambique in the late 1990’s, and it was only after an Indian pharmaceutical company, CIPLA, began producing generic versions of the triple-drug therapy in 2001 that we were able to support drug treatment for people living with HIV and AIDS.  As a result of that delay of more than a dozen years—during which HIV spread unchecked in countries unable to afford drug treatment—some 15 million Africans died of AIDS. 

Right now global access to the vaccine is an important issue that is central to concerns of the Trade and Health group. The WTO patent regulations in question are documented as Trade-Related Intellectual Property right section (TRIPS). The WTO can temporarily waive the patents on COVID vaccines to allow generics to be developed—which would allow a massive scale-up of the immunization effort. The proposal to issue an emergency TRIPS waiver for the period of the pandemic has wide support in low and middle income countries but, so far, is opposed by the currently US administration as well as several other of the rich countries. 

The essence of the patent waiver controversy is, of course, the bottom line. Pharmaceutical profits tend to be substantial; it’s estimated that the profit margin for the Pfizer vaccine, for example, will be four billion dollars by the time the pandemic ends.  The US could be a leader in supporting the proposed TRIPS waiver, but so far has not indicated it’s willing to take that stand.

For more information about this issue, please check out my recent Medium article or any number of concerned groups such as Global Trade Watch and HealthGap.  And take action!

My global health journey: a reflection on my time in the field and advice for students and young professionals

By: Kiran Kamble, M.B.B.S., AFIH, MPH, PhD Candidate

After graduating with a medical degree, I started my professional career as a primary care physician in Mumbai, India, where I partnered with Government of India’s Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP) providing free diagnostic and treatment services to my patients suffering from tuberculosis (TB). In many cases, the financial savings these services created for the low-income families made them avoid bankruptcy. This challenging yet tremendously satisfying experience showed me the complementary nature of clinical medicine and public health. Later, when I took up a job at the World Health Organization supporting India’s RNTCP implementation through public private partnerships (PPP), I got to experience the tremendously influential role of the civil society in public health. Working with the not-for-profit and for-profit health and non-health organizations, I experienced first-hand the importance of socio-economic determinants in health policies and programs.

Later, as a consultant, I got the opportunity to work on diverse projects such as developing the bottom-up (from a village level) action plan for India’s national health sector reform initiative, mapping HIV/AIDS high-risk groups to develop focused behavioral interventions for these groups, operationalizing protocols for emergency first responders, evaluating India’s financial voucher scheme for reducing maternal mortality, and conducting a feasibility study to establish super specialty diagnostic centers through PPPs in underserved areas. I learned the crucial role a public health practitioner can play in shaping public health policy and implementation to improve lives.

My first foray into global public health (global health) was as a member of an international team tasked with revising health policies for the Government of Abu Dhabi. I was amazed with the complexity of developing a health policy, let alone implementing it. Stakeholder mapping, understanding, and accommodating demands of different groups, and balancing and prioritizing conflicting needs is as difficult as performing a heart transplant. I also understood how important it is for a public health practitioner to have basic knowledge of certain quantitative and qualitative skills. On learning those tools through an MPH from Harvard University, I got the opportunity to expand my experience in global health by providing consultancies to The Global Fund, various United Nations (UN) organizations, European Union (EU), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and other global health organizations across 30 countries and counting. Working in fragile nations such as Afghanistan, Central African Republic (CAR), Haiti, Iraq, South Sudan, and Yemen as well as developed countries like Japan and South Korea, gave me insights into different health systems.

My global health experience keeps me grounded when I think of all those ordinary people doing extraordinary tasks that I had the opportunity to learn from. From the Auxiliary Nurse Midwife in a small tribal village in India, who despite being physically assaulted, continued her work of vaccinating children for decades traveling on foot across forests; the Catholic nurses and Ramakrishna Mission priests in Jharkhand, India, who tirelessly provided care to TB and leprosy patients; the community health workers in Iraq and Yemen who risked their lives to ensure availability of HIV, TB, and malaria medicines to hard-to-reach areas; the orthopedic surgeon manning a primary health care center in Afghanistan, working on a meagre salary of $120 per month yet providing free care to the poor; the medical doctor in Guyana who spent after work hours educating people about HIV prevention in his community; the warehouse stock keeper in Haiti who acquired a supply chain management diploma to contribute to strengthening medicine supply in his country; the woman NGO owner in Somali, Ethiopia, who without any technical knowledge or experience, conceptualized a revolving fund system using funds from The Global Fund grant to help people living with HIV establish their own small-scale businesses; the Director of TB Control in Solomon Islands who spent his own funds to travel across the islands to monitor the program; the District Administrator in Oyam, Uganda, who underwent training for malaria control and attended as many village-level camps as he could to motivate his staff; and the Peace Corps volunteers from the United States who get out of their comfort zone to live and work on social projects in the most remote parts in the developing world. There are so many such stories that may never be told but will always inspire me. Besides, COVID-19 has shown us how unavoidably interconnected we are and how important the global health approach is.

So, some of you who want to make a career in global health but wonder how to go about it? Here are my two cents. Most important, in my opinion, is having a passion for public health and acknowledging that it is more than a job. I chose the path of consultancies against a full-time job as I wanted to explore different program areas and it suited my personality better. It is, however, not easy to immediately take a plunge into the world of consultancy. One would need to establish some work experience and build their network. I will give network building a higher level of importance and it should start right from when you are as a student. Try and identify your interest area and reach out to the experts in your field – seeking knowledge of the field and advice on how to maneuver your career path. It is easier said than done but you would be surprised how many would respond to you, provided that you do not put them on the spot by asking for a job recommendation. Use your school faculty and alumni to make such connections and actively use professional networking platforms. Learn what specific skill sets organizations are looking for in your field of interest. Get to know the keywords they look for and try and get those skill sets into your curriculum vitae through the academic route first. At the end I have listed a few resources, apart from your very own APHA membership, that will help you explore global health organizations and jobs.

From my understanding, one of the core requirements in global health, in addition to domain knowledge, is the readiness to travel internationally and relocate, at least initially. The rewards are tremendous personally, academically, professionally, and financially too. Global health will make your friend circle and professional network grow exponentially. And please do not forget the pleasure and honor of interacting with different cultures and learning from them! After having explored a few different career paths myself, medical practice, pharmaceutical manufacturing and retail, and occupational health consulting, I can unequivocally state that there are few other fields like global health that give such breadth and depth of knowledge, exhilaration, soul-satisfaction, and adrenaline rush. Of course, as any other profession, there are risks and stressors, but the benefits certainly outweigh the risks.

A few photos from my global health journey:

Photo Captions
Top Left: Director of National Malaria Program directing his driver through a flooded street in Dushanbe, Tajikistan.
Bottom Left: Hotel constructed from shipping containers in Juba, South Sudan.
Middle: This may just be the world’s smallest pharmacy – in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Right: The smallest plane (6-seater) I have ever traveled in. The pilot asked me to plug a piece of paper in this aperture to keep it open so that air pressure inside the cabin was maintained– Solomon Islands.

Global Health Resources

https://www.fic.nih.gov/Global/Pages/NGOs.aspx, https://www.albany.edu/globalhealth/organizations-working-global-health, https://sph.umich.edu/global/non-governmental-orgs.html; https://ocs.fas.harvard.edu/explore-careers/global-health; https://www.who.int/emergencies/partners/non-governmental-organizations; https://www.tephinet.org/global-health-and-international-nonprofit-organization-websites; http://www.imva.org/Pages/orgfrm.htm;