News Round Up

WORLD POPULATION:  8,013,331,312

YEAR 2050 PROJECTION:  9,800,000,000**

YEAR 2100 PROJECTION:  11,200,000,000**

U.S.  POPULATION:  333,287,557***

* https://www.worldometers.info/world-population

** https://www.un.org/en/desa/world-population-projected-reach-98-billion-2050-and-112-billion-2100

*** https://www.census.gov

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POLITICS & POLICIES

19 January, 2022: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Mark Suzman in his annual letter pushed back against criticism about the organization’s power and influence on key public health initiatives around the world, saying it is not trying to set the world’s agenda on global health and development issues but only “respond to it,” as the foundation announced its biggest ever annual budget Tuesday. In the annual letter, Suzman outlined the Gates Foundation’s plans to spend $8.3 billion on various initiatives in 2023—its highest-ever annual amount—before addressing multiple criticisms leveled at the organization. Without specifically naming anyone the letter pushed back against criticism that “unelected billionaires setting the agenda for global health and development,” saying they simply respond to the agenda already set by global bodies and rely on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals as guidance.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/siladityaray/2023/01/17/gates-foundation-ceo-defends-philanthropys-influence-on-global-health/?sh=4f2a91294be2

4 January, 2023: For the first two years of the Covid-19 pandemic, people working in the infectious diseases and global health spheres were largely focused on the new disease. In 2022, however, gears shifted. Covid didn’t go away, but diseases like flu that had been held in abeyance by the new virus and the measures we used to slow its spread — well, they’re baaack. From late summer onward in the United States, hospitals have been packed with people sick with one respiratory illness or another. As the third year of the Covid pandemic ends and 2023 begins, what can be spotted on the horizon? We already know about a bunch of things that are going to jostle for our attention; rest assured others we’re not anticipating will materialize as well.

3 challenges to watch in global health in 2023

PROGRAMS, PROJECTS, CONFERENCES, GRANTS, AWARDS & EVENTS

3 October, 2022: Today, the U.S. Department of Education (Department) is releasing Notices Inviting Applications for two grant programs to increase access to mental health services for students and young people, totaling $280 million, that were funded through the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (BSCA) and the Fiscal Year 2022 Omnibus Appropriations. The BSCA provided historic funding to help meet President Biden’s goal of doubling the number of school-based mental health professionals and tackling the nation’s mental health crisis. This is the first of $1 billion in Bipartisan Safer Communities Act funds over the next five years that the Department of Education will award for this purpose. “For too long, schools have lacked the resources to hire enough school-based mental health providers, when at the same time, educators are often first to notice when a student is slipping academically or struggling because of mental health challenges,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “We know children and youth can’t do their best learning when they’re experiencing depression, anxiety, and other mental health challenges whether they stem from community violence, social isolation from the pandemic, loss of loved ones, bullying, harassment, or something else. This funding from the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act will help schools raise the bar for student mental health by recruiting, preparing, hiring, and training highly qualified school-based mental health providers, including in underserved communities and for students such as multilingual learners and those from low-income backgrounds and in rural communities, where access to such services can be limited.” 

https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/hundreds-millions-dollars-funds-increase-number-school-based-mental-health-providers-schools-provided-through-bipartisan-safer-communities-act

30 September, 2022: Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), awarded more than $266 million in American Rescue Plan funding to grow the community and public health workforce. “The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to building a robust health workforce to make communities healthy,” said HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra. “Patients depend on community and public health workers for care and medical information. These investments will equip community and public health workers with the skill sets needed to provide effective community outreach, increase access to care, and assist individuals with critical prevention and treatment services.” HRSA is awarding $225.5 million to 83 grantees as part of the Community Health Worker Training Program, which is a new multiyear program that will support training and apprenticeship to support an estimated 13,000 community health workers. Community health workers connect people to care, build trust within communities and facilitate communication between patients and health care providers. They can also be known as promotores de salud, community health advisors, outreach workers, patient navigators and peer counselors.

https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2022/09/30/new-american-rescue-plan-funding-hhs-expands-and-strengthens-community-and-public-health-workforce.html

HISTORICAL, REPORTS, DOCUMENTS, DATA & INDEXES

Your family health history is important to your health. Besides similar looks and lifestyle habits, genes play an important role in your risk of developing certain health conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer. Having a picture of your family’s medical history is a good thing when it comes to proactively managing your health. According to the United States Surgeon General, however, very few people are likely to have detailed and precise information about their family members and their health histories. Though having little information about your family health history is better than having none, a detailed health history can have important information for you, your children, and your health care team.

https://www.pfizer.com/news/articles/why_your_family_health_history_matters

6 October, 2022: The American Revolution had July 4. The allies had D-Day. And now U.S. patients, held down for decades by information hoarders, can rally around a new turning point, October 6, 2022 — the day they got their health data back. Under federal rules taking effect Thursday, health care organizations must give patients unfettered access to their full health records in digital format. No more long delays. No more fax machines. No more exorbitant charges for printed pages. “My great hope is that this will turn the tide on the culture of information blocking,” said Lisa Bari, CEO of Civitas Networks for Health, a nonprofit that supports medical data sharing. “It’s a ground level thing to me: We need to make sure information flows the way patients want it to.”

Call it data liberation day: Patients can now access all their health records digitally  

RESEARCH

23 January, 2023: In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers assessed the importance of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) features as a predictor of internalizing problems. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is described as social-communication difficulties and repetitive and restrictive trends in behavior. Along with the fundamental symptoms of ASD, a significant amount of research has studied the links between mental health issues and AS, particularly internalizing disorders. Notably, internalizing issues have also been associated with lower life quality, physical health, and social activity in ASD, making them crucial intervention targets. ADHD is another neurodevelopmental illness related to internalizing disorders such as anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and depression. Yet, studies on internalizing issues and clinical practice place a much larger focus on ASD than ADHD.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20230123/Is-attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-a-useful-predictor-of-internalizing-problems.aspx

23 January, 2023: Many cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, or ‘hardening of the arteries,’ correlate to mitochondrial dysfunction and endothelial impairment in the tissues of the heart and blood vessels. Despite a significant improvement in therapies to treat cardiovascular disease, there is an unmet need to investigate mitochondria as a therapeutic target. A review published recently explores the existing literature on relevant studies and makes recommendations for further study. The paper was written by Professor Giovanni Ciccarelli, M.D., Interventional Cardiologist at Monaldi Hospital of Naples, Italy, and Adjunct Professor of Biology at the College of Science and Technology at Temple University. Co-authors include an international team working with the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and the Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO), which is led by SHRO Founder and President Antonio Giordano, M.D., Ph.D., professor at Temple University and the University of Siena.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20230123/Mitochondrial-dysfunction-and-endothelial-impairment-linked-to-many-cardiovascular-diseases.aspx

DISEASES & DISASTERS

The list of stressors on the health care system is daunting: climate change and catastrophic weather events, mass casualty incidents, cybersecurity attacks, understaffing and workforce burnout are just some of the challenges that have been confronting health executives for years. Add a global pandemic to the mix – not to mention the threat of future epidemics – and it’s fair to say that hospitals and health systems are being tested as never before. That’s where strong preparedness plans come in. Emergency management officers now need to be at the table in hospital C-suites and boardrooms, and forward-thinking executives must ensure that their critical infrastructure, communication plans and other essential functions are properly designed to mitigate the human and financial costs of future crises. That’s according to a panel of experts who spoke on health care emergency preparedness in a recent webinar hosted by U.S. News & World Report.

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-10-05/helping-hospitals-get-disaster-ready

30 November, 2022: The country is about to enter its fourth calendar year of the coronavirus outbreak, and new variants are expected to make for a tough winter. Researchers think most Americans have had Covid-19 at this point. Studies suggest subsequent infections raise the chances of an “adverse” outcome, including hospitalization and death. The virus has killed more than 1 million Americans to date, and some 2,000 more die each week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Long Covid demonstrates that the virus is taking a lingering, pervasive and perhaps even more insidious toll. Medical experts have called it “the next public health disaster in the making.” “There are just large numbers of people affected by this,” said Dr. Peter Hotez, co-director of the Center for Vaccine Development at Texas Children’s Hospital and a dean at Baylor College of Medicine.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/30/why-long-covid-could-be-the-next-public-health-disaster.html

TECHNOLOGY

12 January, 2023: The World Health Organization warned Wednesday against two cough medicines made in India after the Uzbekistan Health Ministry linked the syrup to the deaths of at least 18 children. It is the second WHO medical alert about Indian-manufactured cough syrup, after the United Nations agency acted on the Gambian Health Ministry’s allegation that Indian medicines caused the deaths of more than 60 children in October. The case in Uzbekistan was linked to a facility of Marion Biotech in Noida, outside of Delhi. The Uzbek Health Ministry said 18 out of 21 children suffering from a respiratory illness took an excess amount of the Indian-made syrup and died afterward. The ministry added that the medicine was withdrawn from the market.

WHO issues new warning on Indian cough syrup after 18 more child deaths

20 January, 2023: According to a report from The Brookings Institution, the healthcare sector’s integration of AI has been more lackadaisical than anticipated, though medical professionals still see the tech tool as an ideal means of both improving health outcomes as well as gaining key diagnostic and treatment insights…

AI Proliferation in Healthcare Slower Than Expected, but Still a Priority

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

10 January, 2023: Heat waves that kill tens of thousands of people at once. Massive floods that not only destroy property but also spread typhoid and cholera. Mosquito-borne illnesses such as dengue fever and malaria, in areas that never saw such diseases before. A new pandemic far deadlier than COVID-19. These are just a few of the dramatic potential health effects of unstoppable climate change — and not 50 years or a century from now, but possibly within the next decade. Global summits routinely discuss the multifaceted dynamics of climate change — from the economic fallout of natural disasters to conflicts driven by precious resources — although the nexus between changing weather patterns and human health has not received as much attention. But the issue will be discussed at the upcoming World Economic Forum in Davos, a sign that policymakers are increasingly recognizing the growing body of evidence that climate change is already wreaking havoc on human health.

https://www.devex.com/news/climate-change-s-toll-on-global-health-increasingly-getting-attention-104758

20 January, 2023: Brazilian environmental agents cut through the rainforest with machetes on Thursday in search of criminals in the first anti–deforestation raids under President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who has pledged to end surging destruction inherited from his predecessor, Jair Bolsonaro. Reuters exclusively accompanied raids led by environmental agency Ibama in the rainforest state of Para to stop loggers and ranchers illegally clearing the forest. The agency also launched raids this week in the states of Roraima and Acre, Ibama environmental enforcement coordinator Tatiane Leite said. About ten Ibama agents set out in pickup trucks on Thursday from their base in the municipality of Uruara, Pará, along with a dozen federal police, heading toward a cluster of points where satellite images showed loggers and ranchers recently at work clearing the forest illegally.

Brazil launches first raids against Amazon tree-cutters under Lula’s new government

EQUITY & DISPARITIES 

19 December, 2022: When acknowledging the impact racism can have on health, it is important to remember that less than a century ago racist ideas were given legitimacy by scientific and medical communities in Western countries. While Charles Darwin is held up as a symbol of rationality and scientific progress, it is important to note that his theory of evolution by natural selection in the Origin of Species published in 1849, was appropriated by eugenicists. Eugenicists argued for the selective breeding of humans with the aim of improving the heritable traits in a population. Originally, these ideas claimed that people on low incomes had lower mental capabilities and morals, and that preventing these people from being able to reproduce would prevent these traits from being passed on, allegedly improving the human gene pool. These ideas were quickly applied to preexisting ideas of racial categories of humans, with impacts on the health of people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds, which we are still seeing today.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-racism-is-a-public-health-threat-expert-perspectives

20 December, 2022: Lots of people struggle to get enough sleep — and the responsibility for fixing the problem tends to fall on the individual. Experts offer advice like reducing screen time, exercising more, or just going to bed earlier in the evening. But many restless nights can’t be solved with blackout curtains, ear plugs, or other typical suggestions. On average, Black adults in the U.S. get poorer sleep than white adults — often for reasons outside of their control. A growing number of experts argue that in order to address such racial disparities, health professionals need to start discussing sleep within the complex tapestry of a person’s life and surroundings. “A large proportion of the disparities in sleep are really due to social and environmental factors” such as noise pollution, said Mercedes Carnethon, vice chair of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and an expert on racial disparities in cardiovascular disease.

Racism leads to troubled sleep — and it’s putting Black Americans’ heart health at risk

WOMEN, MATERNAL, NEONATAL & CHILDREN’S HEALTH

19 January, 2023: Menopause, the end of menstrual cycles, can produce symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia and mood changes. Women do not need to suffer in silence: Many treatment options are available. Jewel Kling, M.D.,  chair of the Division of Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, describes hormonal and nonhormonal therapies. “We sometimes hear the question, ‘Do I need to treat hot flashes or night sweats?’ and the answer for many may be, ‘Yes,'” Dr. Kling says. “Because hot flashes and night sweats affect quality of life and productivity at work and at home for women.” Hormone replacement therapy is an estrogen medication; for women with a uterus, hormone therapy typically includes estrogen plus progestogen medication to prevent endometrial cancer. For women younger than 60 or within 10 years after their final period, the benefit of hormone therapy outweighs the risk in healthy women with postmenopausal symptoms, according to recent guidelines from the North American Menopause Society.  

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/menopause-symptoms-mayo-clinic-expert-outlines-hormone-and-nonhormonal-therapies/

16 January, 2023: A specific colonization of microbes in the reproductive tract is commonly found in women with ovarian cancer, according to a new study from Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine. The discovery, published in Scientific Reports, strengthens evidence that the bacterial component of the microbiome — a community of microorganisms that also consists of viruses, yeasts and fungi — is an important indicator for early detection, diagnosis and prognosis of ovarian cancer. “In addition, we found a clear pattern that reveals women with early stage ovarian cancer have a significantly higher accumulation of the pathogenic microbes when compared to women with later-stage disease,” says Abigail Asangba, Ph.D., a microbiome researcher within the Center for Individualized Medicine. “In later stages, the number of microbes fades. This strong signal could potentially help us diagnose women earlier and save lives — similar to how a noninvasive Pap smear is used to detect cervical cancer.”

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-researchers-link-ovarian-cancer-to-bacteria-colonization-in-microbiome/

POVERTY ALLEVIATION & ERADICATION

8 July, 2022: In its resolution 72/233, the General Assembly proclaimed the Third United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2018–2027). It also considered that the theme of the Third Decade, to be reviewed at its seventy-third sessions, should be “Accelerating global actions for a world without poverty”, in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The core of the present report consists of an inter-agency, system-wide plan of action for poverty eradication to coordinate the efforts of the United Nations system, as well as recommendations concerning how to make the Third Decade effective. As the international community embarks on the Third Decade for the Eradication of Poverty, an estimated 783 million people lived on less than $1.90 a day in 2013, compared with 1.867 billion people in 1990. Economic growth across developing countries has been remarkable since 2000, with faster growth in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita than advanced countries. This economic growth has fuelled poverty reduction and improvements in living standards. Achievements have also been recorded in such areas as job creation, gender equality, education and health care, social protection measures, agriculture and rural development, and climate change adaptation and mitigation.

https://www.un.org/development/desa/socialperspectiveondevelopment/2022/07/08/third-un-decade-poverty/

30 June, 2022: CPAN has been working with its partners to understand poverty dynamics (escaping poverty, impoverishment, chronic poverty) in low and lower middle income countries since 2011, building on the work of the Chronic Poverty Research Centre. It works with a combination of household panel survey and qualitative research data (life histories, focus group discussions and key informant interviews), draws out policy implications and engages with national and international policy makers and other stakeholders. It produces international Chronic Poverty Reports, the last of which was on growth, and is starting work on a new report on the pandemic. During the pandemic CPAN researchers returned to re-interview people interviewed pre-pandemic, and produced a number of bulletins as part of a Covid-19 Poverty Monitoring Initiative. It is continuing and synthesizing this work.

https://www.un.org/development/desa/socialperspectiveondevelopment/2022/06/30/chronic-poverty/

HUMANITARIAN, NONPROFITS, FOUNDATIONS & NGOS

16 January, 2023: The Taliban’s 24 December 2022 decree barring women from working in national and international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) is another devastating blow to women’s rights in Afghanistan. It also threatens to plunge a country beset by hunger and natural disasters even deeper into a public health crisis. The United Nations and its humanitarian partners are engaged in intense negotiations to persuade the Taliban to reverse the edict. But for now, many NGOs, which depend heavily on female staff, have made the heart-wrenching decision to suspend their operations, which provide vital food, hygiene, and medicines. The decree also jeopardizes the global campaign to eradicate polio, in which women play crucial roles raising awareness and vaccinating children. Afghanistan and its neighbor Pakistan are the last two countries where the wild poliovirus is still endemic, and the campaign is going full bore to wipe it out by the end of this year.

https://www.science.org/content/article/taliban-s-ban-female-staff-ngos-deepening-afghanistan-s-public-health-crisis

The Taliban administration last month ordered local and foreign aid organisations to stop letting female staff work until further notice. It said the move — condemned globally — was justified because some women had not adhered to the Taliban’s interpretation of Islamic dress code. Many NGOs suspended operations in response, saying they needed female workers to reach women in the conservative country. “Last week, the Ministry of Public Health offered assurances that female health staff, and those working in office support roles, can resume working. Based on this clarity, IRC has restarted health and nutrition services through our static and mobile health teams in four provinces,” Nancy Dent, a spokesperson for IRC, said. A spokesperson from the Afghan Ministry of Public Health told the Reuters news agency that they had not stopped any health-related activities.

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2023/1/17/ngos-resume-some-operations-with-women-in-afghanistan

News Round Up

WORLD POPULATION:  8,008,752,896

YEAR 2100 PROJECTION:  11,200,000,000 

U.S. POPULATION: 334,236,798 

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POLITICS & POLICIES

23 December, 2022: Health Affairs Forefront will not publish during the week of December 26 through December 30. We will next publish on January 3, 2023. Happy holidays to all, and see you in the New Year! Serious mental illness (SMI) is a construct widely used in mental health services policy. As discussed in detail in recent papers by Jeffrey A. Buck and Lauren Gonzales and colleagues, the construct has some shortcomings, but it remains a useful tool for allocating scarce resources. It is not a clinical condition but rather an administrative designation that has been defined differently across contexts. While critics have argued that the construct’s definitional vagueness presents challenges for enumerating the population with SMI nationally, those differences simply reflect the variable needs for the SMI designation across different settings. In his article, Buck sets forth the case that the construct is overly restrictive and stigmatizing. However, we contend that the narrowness is reflective of how the category is used to allocate scarce resources to those who are most in need. Stigma is not inherent in the terminology but rather, a reflection of the persistent stigma associated with mental illness more generally. The SMI construct entered into use in the 1980s in an effort to expand the priority population for mental health services and not to restrict services, and the term was chosen as a less stigmatizing term than the prevailing designations at the time. While Buck’s analysis emphasizes the perils of the current use of SMI, there is an instructive irony in the history of the emergence of the term.

https://www.healthaffairs.org/content/forefront/serious-need-serious-mental-illness-construct

22 December, 2022: This article is part of a Health Affairs Forefront short series, “Meeting America’s Public Health Challenge.” This series includes articles that reflect on and are inspired by a report of the same name released in June 2022 by the Commonwealth Fund Commission on a National Public Health System. The series was developed and published with support from the Commonwealth Fund, a nonpartisan foundation. Health Affairs retained review and editing rights. After the September 11 attacks, Congress invested billions of dollars in what was largely an emerging field: public health preparedness. Entire systems were built at many governmental public health departments to make us be better prepared. Over time, the mantra became “all hazards”—that is, be prepared for a terrorist attack, a natural disaster, or a novel infectious disease outbreak. But as terrorism fears waned, Congress’ attention shifted, and funds were reduced.

https://www.healthaffairs.org/content/forefront/lessons-chicago-and-columbus-consequences-underfunding-public-health

PROGRAMS, PROJECTS, CONFERENCES, GRANTS, AWARDS & EVENTS

29 November, 2022: Today, CDC is awarding $3.2 billion to help state, local, and territorial jurisdictions across the United States strengthen their public health workforce and infrastructure. This first-of-its-kind funding provides awards directly to state, local, and territorial health departments to provide the people, services, and systems needed to promote and protect health in U.S. communities. Everyone in the United States lives in a jurisdiction that will receive funding under this new grant. “State, local, and territorial health departments are the heart of the U.S. public health system, and the COVID-19 pandemic severely stressed these agencies, which were already weakened by neglect and underinvestment,” said CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, M.D., M.P.H. “This grant gives these agencies critical funding and flexibility to build and reinforce the nation’s public health workforce and infrastructure, and protect the populations they serve. We are meeting them where they are and trusting them to know what works best for their communities.”

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2022/p1129-cdc-infrastructure.html

30 September, 2022: Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), awarded more than $266 million in American Rescue Plan funding to grow the community and public health workforce.

“The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to building a robust health workforce to make communities healthy,” said HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra. “Patients depend on community and public health workers for care and medical information. These investments will equip community and public health workers with the skill sets needed to provide effective community outreach, increase access to care, and assist individuals with critical prevention and treatment services.”

https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2022/09/30/new-american-rescue-plan-funding-hhs-expands-and-strengthens-community-and-public-health-workforce.html

HISTORICAL, REPORTS, DOCUMENTS, DATA & INDEXES

Published since 1878 – PDF, Public Health Reports (PHR) exit disclaimer icon is the official journal of the office of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. Public Health Service. PHR is published by SAGE Publishing Inc. through an agreement with the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH). This peer-reviewed public health journal features bimonthly articles on public health practice, research, training, and writing. The oldest public health journal in US, PHR has covered throughout its history various important public health issues of the day. Explore the journal’s article collections  on the health harms of racism exit disclaimer icon and emerging viral pandemics exit disclaimer icon as well as a 2010 special issue exit disclaimer icon on 1918 and 2009 influenza pandemics. PHR’s entire output since 1878 has been digitalized and is available on PubMed. It is summarized in the 2006 collection exit disclaimer icon of commentaries by contemporary public health leaders highlighting the journal’s most impactful historic contributions and in the 2008 editorial exit disclaimer icon celebrating the journal’s 140-year anniversary.

https://www.hhs.gov/surgeongeneral/reports-and-publications/publichealthreports/index.html

The development of public health began in ancient times. Health measures involved, for example, the quarantine of leprosy victims in the Middle Ages. Early international efforts in disease control occurred in national quarantines in Europe and the middle east.  Over time, correlations between disease and environment were increasingly understood and refined, and from the 14th century onwards the plague epidemics spurred efforts to improve sanitation. During the last 150 years two factors have shaped the modern public health system: 1. The proliferation of scientific knowledge about the source and control of disease 2. Increasing acceptance of disease control as possible and as a public responsibility. This article presents a brief overview of the history of public health from the Middle Ages towards the present day, first beginning with a brief characterization of public health.

https://www.news-medical.net/health/History-of-Public-Health.aspx

RESEARCH

30 December, 2022: As a chronic pro-inflammatory disease, obesity is closely associated with the development of various diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancers. Obesity is now a major concern for public health. Macrophages have been known to play an important role in the development of obesity. Recent studies have shown that adipose tissue-resident macrophages respond to the intake of fat, and regulate fat storage in a paracrine fashion. Macrophages are no longer just a “player”, but a “culprit” in the development of obesity.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221230/Study-reveals-novel-role-of-PPARceb3-acetylation-in-macrophages-in-impairing-adipose-tissue-function.aspx

29 December, 2022: In a recent study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers compared coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-specific long-term consequences to other viral respiratory infections. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, an increasing number of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) patients have experienced persistent and long-lasting symptoms that linger for far longer than the typical duration of COVID-19 infection. A few symptoms, like fatigue, breathlessness, and brain fog, have been widely reported, but several other long-lasting repercussions of COVID-19 remain unexplored.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221229/What-are-the-long-term-consequences-following-COVID-19-and-other-viral-respiratory-infections.aspx

DISEASES & DISASTERS

30 November, 2022: Sam Norpel used to present regular financial updates to C-suite executives. Now, unpredictable bouts of broken, staccato speech make that impossible for the former e-commerce executive. Despite being up to date with vaccines and boosters, Norpel, 48, got Covid-19 in December 2021, when the highly transmissible omicron variant was fueling record U.S. caseloads. She never got better — and in fact, feels worse, with a range of debilitating symptoms that make it impossible to work.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/30/why-long-covid-could-be-the-next-public-health-disaster.html

8 December, 2022: Thursday marks 1,000 days that Texans have been living under Gov. Greg Abbott’s public health disaster proclamation — an era of unprecedented gubernatorial authority for the state’s chief executive, triggered by the March 2020 scramble to contain the COVID-19 pandemic that continues to kill Texans every day. The entire nation remains under a federal public health emergency at least through the winter season, which experts say could bring another wave of infections as families gather indoors for the holidays, immunity dips or virus variants sidestep older vaccines. But after more than 92,000 deaths and 8 million COVID-19 cases in Texas in the 32 months since the declaration was made, the state remains one of less than a dozen still under a statewide declared disaster or public health emergency.

https://www.texastribune.org/2022/12/08/texas-public-health-disaster-covid-greg-abbott/

TECHNOLOGY

27 December, 2022: Whether to provide more comprehensive patient care or prevent themselves from burning out, a growing number of physicians around the United States are making the transition to concierge medicine. These physicians care for fewer patients but spend more time with them, and by charging upfront membership fees, they avoid many of the hassles of dealing with health insurance. Though it began primarily as a service for the wealthy, concierge medicine is increasingly available and affordable. Meanwhile, though it remains a small percentage of all care delivered in the U.S., concierge medicine is poised for continued growth. Physicians and patients alike say they prefer the in-person care experience, while technology investments improve patient engagement and support more personalized care.

https://healthtechmagazine.net/article/2022/12/concierge-medicine-creates-better-patient-outcomes-perfcon

29 December 2022: ATLANTA (AP) — Parts of a law overhauling insurance coverage for mental health, new ways for parents to challenge materials used in schools and a tax credit for donating to police are among new laws taking effect Sunday in Georgia. Most Georgia laws take effect on July 1, but the General Assembly delayed some laws, or parts of laws, until Jan. 1. That is particularly true of some tax provisions for taxes collected on a yearly basis. Among the measures that took effect earlier in 2022 were a repeal of the requirement for a permit to carry a concealed handgun in public, a ban on teaching certain racial concepts that Republicans say are divisive, and a $1.1 billion state income tax refund that sent between $250 and $500 to many households.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/georgia/articles/2022-12-29/mental-health-reporting-requirements-among-new-georgia-laws

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

 30 December, 2022: The Biden administration this year signed into law a historic climate and tax deal that will funnel billions of dollars into programs designed to speed the transition to clean energy. The Inflation Reduction Act will have major implications for energy and manufacturing businesses, climate startups and consumers in the upcoming years. As 2022 comes to a close, here’s a look back at the key elements in the deal that climate and clean energy advocates will be watching closely in 2023. The Biden administration this year signed a historic climate and tax deal that will funnel billions of dollars into programs designed to speed the country’s clean energy transition and battle climate change. As the U.S. this year grappled with climate-related disasters from Hurricane Ian in Florida to the Mosquito Fire in California, the Inflation Reduction Act, which contains $369 billion in climate provisions, was a monumental development to mitigate the effects of climate change across the country. 

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/12/30/2022-climate-recap-whats-in-the-historic-inflation-reduction-act.html

26 December, 2022: The “microfinance” industry — long touted as a way to help poor, rural communities in developing countries — is pushing tens of thousands of farming families into debt traps as they attempt to adapt to a changing climate, according to a report. The study, conducted by researchers at a group of U.K. universities, looked at a range of case studies in Cambodia, where it found easy-access loans had caused an “overindebtedness emergency” that was undermining borrowers’ long-term ability to cope with their new environment.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/12/27/facing-climate-change-asia-farmers-turn-to-risky-microfinance-loans.html

EQUITY & DISPARITIES 

15 November, 2022: A community health program that included exercise classes and hands-on nutrition education helped women living in rural areas lower their blood pressure, lose weight and stay healthy, according to a new study. Compared to women in urban areas, women in rural communities have higher cardiovascular disease risk, are more likely to have obesity and tend to have less access to health care and healthy food, previous research has shown. While community health programs have shown promise, little research has looked at these programs in rural settings. The new study focused on sedentary women, age 40 or older, who were diagnosed as overweight or having obesity. They lived in 11 rural communities in upstate New York. All participants eventually took part in the program led by health educators, but five communities were randomly assigned to go first.

https://www.heart.org/en/news/2022/11/15/a-new-route-to-keeping-women-in-rural-communities-healthy

28 December, 2022: If someone dies at home, if they have symptoms not typically associated with the disease or if they die when local health systems are overwhelmed, their death certificate might say “heart disease” or “natural causes” when COVID-19 is, in fact, at fault. New research shows such inaccuracies also are more likely for Americans who are Black, Hispanic, Asian or Native. The true toll of the COVID-19 pandemic on many communities of color – from Portland, Oregon, to Navajo Nation tribal lands in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah, to sparsely populated rural Texas towns – is worse than previously known. Incorrect death certificates add to the racial and ethnic health disparities exacerbated by the pandemic, which stem from long-entrenched barriers to medical care, employment, education, housing and other factors. Mortality data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention point to COVID-19’s disastrous impacts, in a new analysis by the Documenting COVID-19 Project at Columbia University’s Brown Institute for Media Innovation and MuckRock, in collaboration with Boston University’s School of Global Public Health; the USA TODAY Network; the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting; Willamette Week in Portland; and the Texas Observer.

https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/health/2022/12/28/uncounted-covid-deaths-disparities/10590932002/

WOMEN, MATERNAL, NEONATAL & CHILDREN’S HEALTH

5 December, 2022: The House Friday voted 390-26 to approve bipartisan legislation (H.R.8876) that would reauthorize the federal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program and double annual funding for the program to $800 million over five years. The Ways and Means Committee advanced the legislation in September. Funding for the program lapses if the Senate does not take action before the current continuing resolution expires on Dec. 16.

https://www.aha.org/news/headline/2022-12-05-house-passes-maternal-home-visiting-bill

Memora Health, which focuses on virtual care delivery and complex care management, hopes the initiative will reduce the burden on clinical and administrative teams at Mayo Clinic and extend the relationship between care teams and new mothers. Memora’s care programs digitize workflows and patient communications via AI-supported messaging and established clinical and administrative processes. The partners will track key metrics closely to assess the impact of the initiative, Memora CEO Manav Sevak told MedCity News. The pilot will measure how many patients report postpartum depression in the first six weeks after delivery so that they can be treated before symptoms become severe, as well as those who experience excess bleeding or ongoing body pain to see if interventions lead to reductions in emergency department or urgent care visits.

https://www.aha.org/aha-center-health-innovation-market-scan/2022-11-08-mayo-clinic-study-digitized-workflows-ai-backed-messaging-improve

POVERTY ALLEVIATION & ERADICATION

8 July, 2022: In its resolution 72/233, the General Assembly proclaimed the Third United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2018–2027). It also considered that the theme of the Third Decade, to be reviewed at its seventy-third sessions, should be “Accelerating global actions for a world without poverty”, in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The core of the present report consists of an inter-agency, system-wide plan of action for poverty eradication to coordinate the efforts of the United Nations system, as well as recommendations concerning how to make the Third Decade effective. As the international community embarks on the Third Decade for the Eradication of Poverty, an estimated 783 million people lived on less than $1.90 a day in 2013, compared with 1.867 billion people in 1990. Economic growth across developing countries has been remarkable since 2000, with faster growth in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita than advanced countries. This economic growth has fuelled poverty reduction and improvements in living standards. Achievements have also been recorded in such areas as job creation, gender equality, education and health care, social protection measures, agriculture and rural development, and climate change adaptation and mitigation. To eradicate poverty by 2030, given current rates of population growth, it will be necessary to reduce by about 110 million every year the number of people living on less than $1.90 a day. The United Nations system plays an important role in meeting that global challenge. The present section highlights priority areas of the response of the United Nations system as an integral component of global action for the effective implementation of the 2030 Agenda. While the support of the United Nations system is necessary, it will have the most impact when countries put in place the right integrated policies to fight poverty at the local, national and regional levels, supported by an enabling international environment, as recognized in relevant resolutions adopted by Member States

https://www.un.org/development/desa/socialperspectiveondevelopment/2022/07/08/third-un-decade-poverty/

14 october, 2022: Washington, DC: Today, the EU signed a €100 million grant agreement (about US$97.2 million) for the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (PRGT). These funds will allow the IMF to make about €630 million worth of zero interest loans for PRGT-eligible African, Caribbean and Pacific countries (ACP) facing balance of payments difficulties. Access to affordable finance is key to help these countries address the economic and food crisis situation worsened by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The EU’s contribution is part of Team Europe’s response to the crisis as it complements pledges by EU Member States to channel Special Drawing Rights (SDR) to the IMF’s Trusts for on-lending and their grants to the IMF’s PRGT Subsidy Account. Team Europe has so far pledged to channel SDRs contributions equivalent to about $23 billion. Commissioner for International Partnerships, Jutta Urpilainen, said: “ Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine has made many African, Caribbean and Pacific countries more vulnerable at a time when they were still struggling with the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, and millions of people are pushed into poverty and hunger. With our contribution to the IMF’s Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust, we want to help them address this crisis and avoid further deepening of inequalities. Today’s signature also marks our commitment as Team Europe to multilateral solutions to tackle today’s most pressing challenges. Our partnership with the IMF is of key relevance in this regard.”

https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2022/10/14/pr22351-food-security-eu-contributes-100-million-euros-to-imf-prg-to-support-vulnerable-countries

News Round Up

WORLD POPULATION:  8,001,985,536

YEAR 2100 PROJECTION:  11,200,000,000 

U.S. POPULATION: 333,316,762 

______________________________________________________________

POLITICS & POLICIES

November 25, 2022: BEIJING (AP) — Residents of some parts of China’s capital were emptying supermarket shelves and overwhelming delivery apps Friday as the city government ordered faster construction of COVID-19 quarantine centers and field hospitals. Uncertainty and scattered, unconfirmed reports of lockdowns in at least some Beijing districts have fueled demand for food and other supplies, something not seen in the city for months.

https://www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2022-11-25/panic-buying-in-beijing-as-city-adds-new-quarantine-centers

PROGRAMS, PROJECTS, CONFERENCES, GRANTS, AWARDS & EVENTS

November 21, 2022: The 2022 edition of the European Public Health Conference – Europe’s largest gathering of public health associations, institutes and professionals – convened in Berlin on 9–12 November, culminating in calls for investments in stronger health systems in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking part in the conference with a WHO/Europe delegation of experts, Dr Hans Henri P. Kluge, WHO Regional Director for Europe, urged the public health community in the region to adopt a “dual-track” approach to stronger health systems in countries, focusing on both the provision of high-quality services and emergency preparedness and response. “In a world of ever-increasing health crises, at a time of economic and financial turmoil, we must accept and work within this new paradigm. On one hand, we must invest significantly in preparing for mounting and often overlapping emergencies,” Dr Kluge explained. “And on the other, we must ensure that we redouble our efforts to prevent illness, promote health and strengthen day-to-day essential health services.” 

https://www.who.int/europe/news/item/21-11-2022-harnessing-the-power-of-partnerships-at-europe-s-largest-public-health-conference

HISTORICAL, REPORTS, DOCUMENTS, DATA & INDEXES

The development of public health began in ancient times. Health measures involved, for example, the quarantine of leprosy victims in the Middle Ages. Early international efforts in disease control occurred in national quarantines in Europe and the middle east.  Over time, correlations between disease and environment were increasingly understood and refined, and from the 14th century onwards the plague epidemics spurred efforts to improve sanitation.

https://www.news-medical.net/health/History-of-Public-Health.aspx

RESEARCH

November 25, 2022: Announcing a new article publication for Zoonoses journal. Bats are the hosts of multiple pathogens, but the microbial composition of their lung tissues remains unknown. This study investigates the species compositions and genera of important respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria in bat lung tissue. A microbiota study was conducted in Hebei, Henan and Guizhou provinces in China. Lung tissues were collected from 104 healthy bats. The lung tissue was subjected to 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221125/Study-investigates-microbial-composition-in-bat-lung-tissue.aspx

DISEASES & DISASTERS

August 5, 2022; There’s no test for long Covid. There’s no specific drug to take or exercises to do to ease its symptoms. There isn’t a consensus on what long Covid symptoms are, and some doctors even doubt that it’s real. Yet with vast numbers of people having had Covid-19, and estimates ranging from 7.7 million to 23 million long Covid patients in the US alone, researchers say it has the potential to be “the next public health disaster in the making.”

TECHNOLOGY

November 21, 2022: Healthcare organizations face a staffing shortage when it comes to physicians and nurses, but they’re also in urgent need of skilled cybersecurity professionals. And as more health systems experience ransomware and potential vulnerabilities in connected medical devices, security must be a top organizational goal. Health systems are well aware of the potential impact of cyberattacks on patient care, but they are running into issues trying to address it amid budget constraints and workforce shortages. They don’t have to shoulder the burden alone. Just as care teams work together to treat patients, organizations can rely on partnerships to improve the health of their security. And just as clinicians provide a whole-person approach to care, a partnership with a healthcare security expert can offer a more holistic path rather than patched-together solutions.

https://healthtechmagazine.net/article/2022/11/why-healthcare-cybersecurity-team-effort

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

November 24, 2022: The annual climate talks are sometimes compared to a circus, or a battleground. This year’s summit, held at the Egyptian resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, and known in the jargon as cop27, was an appropriate mix of comedy and rancour. Problems with the catering left many delegates scrounging for sandwiches and bananas in between meetings and group calls. John Kerry, America’s chief negotiator, was stricken with covid-19 and was forced to negotiate from the isolation of his hotel room.

https://www.economist.com/international/2022/11/20/a-new-un-fund-for-loss-and-damage-emerges-from-cop27

EQUITY & DISPARITIES 

November 4, 2022: BOSTON — As the health and safety of trans and queer youth are jeopardized across the country, there were a few minutes of hope on Wednesday in Boston when Adm. Rachel Levine, the assistant secretary for health at the Department of Health and Human Services and first transgender federal official confirmed by the U.S. Senate, visited the Boston Alliance of LGBTQ+ Youth. https://www.statnews.com/2022/11/04/rachel-levine-on-gender-affirming-care/

WOMEN, MATERNAL, NEONATAL & CHILDREN’S HEALTH

November 23, 2022: MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Democrats hope to use their newfound political control in some states to guarantee that women have access to abortion, while some GOP strongholds may temper their efforts to deepen restrictions after poorer-than-expected results in the midterms.

https://www.usnews.com/news/politics/articles/2022-11-23/after-midterms-states-weighing-abortion-protections-bans

POVERTY ALLEVIATION & ERADICATION

October 5, 2022: The world is unlikely to meet the goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030 absent history-defying rates of economic growth over the remainder of this decade, according to a new World Bank study. The study finds that COVID-19 dealt the biggest setback to global poverty-reduction efforts since 1990 and the war in Ukraine threatens to make matters worse. The Bank’s latest Poverty and Shared Prosperity Report provides the first comprehensive look at the global landscape of poverty in the aftermath of the extraordinary series of shocks to the global economy over the past few years. It estimates that the pandemic pushed about 70 million people into extreme poverty in 2020, the largest one-year increase since global poverty monitoring began in 1990. As a result, an estimated 719 million people subsisted on less than $2.15 a day by the end of 2020.

https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2022/10/05/global-progress-in-reducing-extreme-poverty-grinds-to-a-halt

HUMANITARIAN, NONPROFITS, FOUNDATIONS & NGOS

November 23, 2022: Project HOPE has a permanent presence in Indonesia through the Yayasan Project HOPE office which aims to transform lives and uplift communities by empowering health-care workers to teach and deliver innovative, lifesaving solutions, every day and in times of crisis. Led by our Emergency Response Staff in Indonesia, Project HOPE is engaging with an established network of partners in the region, many of whom have mobilized in response to the earthquake. These local network partners include the IBU Foundation, a humanitarian organization that focuses support on mothers and children, KUN Humanity System, a medical response organization that provides mobile medical units in remote environments, and Yayasan Wanadri, an outdoor organization that supports search and rescue efforts as well as provides first-aid. https://www.projecthope.org/cianjur-indonesia-earthquake-what-you-need-to-know/11/2022/

News Round Up 

WORLD POPULATION:  7,986,457,315

YEAR 2100 PROJECTION:  11,200,000,000 

U.S. POPULATION:  335,614,431

POLITICS & POLICIES

November 4, 2022: The global climate confab that begins on Sunday is on a nasty crash course with reality. Organizers of the U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, known as COP27, are framing it as a forum for discussing actions, not promises — and in particular, as an opportunity for wealthy nations such as the United States to spell out how they plan to deliver on their pledges of financial assistance for poorer countries facing climate disaster.

https://www.politico.com/news/2022/11/04/climate-change-solve-cop27-00065263

PROGRAMS, PROJECTS, CONFERENCES, GRANTS, AWARDS & EVENTS

September/October 2022: Access to nutritious and safe food has become increasingly unreliable for many of the world’s poor, an issue exacerbated by the pandemic, climate change and conflict. Research on nutrition, food insecurity and health outcomes is now necessary, even crucial, both domestically and abroad. A three-part webinar hosted by Fogarty, “Learning from Global Food/Nutrition Insecurity,” will feature innovative research projects in global settings. 

https://www.fic.nih.gov/News/GlobalHealthMatters/september-october-2022/Pages/global-food-insecurity-webinar-series.aspx

HISTORICAL, REPORTS, DOCUMENTS, DATA & INDEXES

Please note, global and hemispheric anomalies are with respect to the 20th century average. Coordinate anomalies are with respect to the 1981 to 2010 average. All other regional anomalies are with respect to the 1910 to 2000 average.

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/access/monitoring/climate-at-a-glance/global/time-series/globe/land_ocean/12/9/1880-2022

The WHO Global Tuberculosis Programme works towards the goal of a world free of TB, with zero deaths, disease and suffering due to the disease. The team’s mission is to lead and guide the global effort to end the TB epidemic through universal access to people-centred prevention and care, multisectoral action and innovation.

https://www.who.int/teams/global-tuberculosis-programme/data

RESEARCH

October 28, 2022: We tend to think of ourselves as ourselves: a collection of DNA-directed human cells that make up our bodies and carry out life’s important processes. Only we need help. A lot of help. In sheer numbers of cells, we’re arguably more parts bacteria and other microbes than human. That universe within is called the microbiome— actually multiple microbiomes inhabiting different parts of the body. Without them, we couldn’t live. Science is just now getting a handle on the body’s microbiomes and their surprising impacts on human health. It’s not easy work.

https://magazine.jhsph.edu/2022/meet-your-microbiomes

September / October 2022: A long-standing Fogarty-funded training partnership between Emory University and Georgian National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NCTLD) played a critical role in the ZeNix trial testing a three-medication antibiotic regimen called ‘BPaL’ to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in record time. Findings from this study, recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine , are expected to impact treatment protocols around the globe.

https://www.fic.nih.gov/News/GlobalHealthMatters/september-october-2022/Pages/fogarty-program-central-groundbreaking-tuberculosis-treament-trial.aspx

DISEASES & DISASTERS

October 19, 2022: The World Health Organization said on Wednesday that COVID-19 remains a global emergency, nearly three years after it was first declared as one. The WHO’s emergency committee first made the declaration for COVID-19 on Jan 30, 2020. Such a determination can help accelerate research, funding and international public health measures to contain a disease. The UN-agency has said in recent months that while cases are falling in parts of the world, countries still need to maintain their vigilance and push to get their most vulnerable populations vaccinated.

https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/who-says-covid-19-is-still-global-health-emergency-2022-10-19/

TECHNOLOGY

November 1, 2022: A Florida-based health records company has agreed to pay $45 million to resolve allegations that it improperly generated sales and caused users to report inaccurate information, the U.S. attorney’s office in Vermont announced Tuesday. The government alleges in the civil case that Modernizing Medicine Inc., of Boca Raton, violated the False Claims Act and the anti-kickback statute through three marketing programs that increased its business and that of a laboratory company it was working with.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/vermont/articles/2022-11-01/electronic-health-records-firm-to-pay-45m-for-false-claims

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

November 4, 2022: The study gives the example of Dhaka, Bangladesh, where under a scenario of very high emissions by 2100, additional deaths due to climate change could rise to nearly twice the country’s current annual death rate from all cancers, and 10 times its annual road traffic fatalities. “Because of human action, the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is reaching dangerous levels, driving Earth’s temperatures higher and amplifying the frequency of intensity of extreme events”, says the newly launched Human Climate Horizons platform, adding that without concerted and urgent action, climate change will further exacerbate inequalities, and uneven development.

https://news.un.org/story/2022/11/1130202

EQUITY & DISPARITIES

November 2, 2022: Edition of the Prioritizing Equity series, Karthik Sivashanker, MD, vice president at the AMA Center for Health Equity, speaks with participants from the Peer Network for Advancing Equity through Quality and Safety program on their strategies for operationalizing equity into their quality and safety operations.

https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/health-equity/prioritizing-equity-video-series-advancing-equity-through-quality

WOMEN, MATERNAL, NEONATAL & CHILDREN’S HEALTH

October 27, 2022: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services yesterday approved state plan amendments allowing Georgia and Pennsylvania to extend postpartum coverage from 60 days to 12 months after pregnancy for Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program enrollees under the American Rescue Plan Act. They join 24 other states and Washington, D.C., in opting to extend the coverage under either the ARPA state plan option or section 1115 demonstration authority.

https://www.aha.org/news/headline/2022-10-27-cms-2-more-states-join-majority-extend-medicaid-postpartum-coverage

POVERTY ALLEVIATION & ERADICATION

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the share of the world’s population living in extreme poverty fell from 10.1 per cent in 2015 to 9.3 per cent in 2017. This means that the number of people living on less than $1.90 per day dropped from 741 million to 689 million. However, the rate of reduction had slowed to less than half a percentage point annually between 2015 and 2017, compared with one percentage point annually between 1990 and 2015.

https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/report/2021/goal-01/

October 14, 2022: COVID-19 has had a profound impact on health and well-being around the world. In this blog, we report updated nowcasts of global poverty up to 2022. Estimates of global poverty for the years up to 2019 are available in the World Bank’s Poverty and Inequality Platform (PIP). Our past projections of global poverty (for instance see here) used only the growth in average national income to project each household’s income. In this blog, we present estimates of global poverty allowing for differential growth across households within a country, featured in the 2022 Poverty and Shared Prosperity Report.  

https://blogs.worldbank.org/opendata/global-poverty-2020s-new-worse-course

HUMANITARIAN, NONPROFITS, FOUNDATIONS & NGOS

March 15, 2022: A mix of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, and ongoing conflicts have fueled a substantial increase in the need for worldwide humanitarian assistance and protection. According to a recent United Nations (UN) overview, 274 million people will require aid in 2022, up from 235 million people last year. Assistance for 183 million people most in need across 63 countries will require $41 billion, according to the UN and its partners.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2789957

APHA Annual Meeting 2022: International Health Program Highlights

Hi members!

We are excited to see you in Boston! We’d love to meet you at our booth in the Exhibit Hall, our Open House/Business Meeting on Sunday at 10 AM, or our Networking/Awards Ceremony on Tuesday at 6:30 PM. Below are a few highlighted events from the International Health program.

Don’t forget to follow us on social media and tag us in your photos and posts!
Twitter @ih_section
Facebook @apha.ih.section
Instagram @apha.ih
Visit us on the web at https://www.aphaih.org

Want to talk about your experiences at APHA 2022 and be featured in our upcoming newsletter? Let us know at ihsection.communications@gmail.com 

See you soon!
Jean, Amanda, Chris, and Kinjal

International Health Section Communications Committee

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International Health Program Highlights Community-Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) Working Group Pre-Conference Event – Community Health Workers at the Dawn of a New Era

Saturday, November 5
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Registration is required. Learn more at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/community-health-workers-at-the-dawn-of-a-new-era-tickets-395264074487

International Health Section Open House and Business Meeting

Sunday, November 6
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/65409

Global Maternal and Child Health Network Business Meeting

Monday, November 7
6:15 PM – 7:45 PM

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/66761

International Health Policy and Advocacy Committee Meeting

Monday, November 7
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/66766

International Health Section Awards and Reception

Tuesday, November 8
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Join us for a fun night of networking and a short awards ceremony to recognize outstanding members who have contributed in an important way to global health and our section. https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/66529 

Palestine Health Justice Working Group

Tuesday, November 8
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/66768

International Health Luncheon

November 9
12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Session/66681 

View the entire International Health program here: https://apha.confex.com/apha/2022/meetingapp.cgi/Program/2202