Global News Round Up

Politics & Policies

At the urging of the White House, Germany nixed language referring to “sexual and reproductive health” in a signature UN resolution taking aim at rape in conflict situations, Foreign Policy reports.

Programs, Grants & Awards

The DMU Department of Global Health’s Distinguished Global Health Internships are highly selective research opportunities that enable students to explore global health research topics at various organizations. Students have the opportunity to work with researchers on projects such as conducting systematic reviews to create evidence-based educational materials for worldwide distribution.

Research

A swarm of micro-robots, directed by magnets, can break apart and remove dental biofilm, or plaque, from a tooth. The innovation arose from a cross-disciplinary partnership among dentists, biologists, and engineers.

Diseases & Disasters

Imagine your house is gone. And yet the TV set is still standing.  That’s one of the scenes that photojournalist Tommy Trenchard documented as he visited parts of Mozambique hit by Cyclone Kenneth on Thursday.

Measles continues to spread in the United States, federal health officials said on Monday, surpassing 700 cases this year as health officials around the country sought aggressive action to stem the worst outbreak in decades.

Nearly three weeks since fighting began near the Libyan capital Tripoli, the UN health agency warned on Tuesday that “large numbers” of people are sheltering in medical clinics, while civilians continue to be killed or injured, and refugees and migrants remain exposed to clashes.

Students are currently being quarantined in Los Angeles. Mandatory-vaccination policies have been implemented in Brooklyn. Even President Donald Trump, contrary to prior assertions, today urged people to get children vaccinated.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) today reported another double-digit rise in Ebola cases, as local leaders such as traditional chiefs and provincial representatives stepped up their efforts to convince community members to support the response efforts to end the outbreak.

In South Sudan mind-bending horrors abound of war, ethnic violence, rape, hunger and displacement.  But for civilians living in the shadow of conflict, the greatest danger is often being cut off from health services, whether due to violence or lack of development in the vast, remote areas that make up much of the country.

Technology

The CDC is issuing new guidance to clinicians for the treatment of severe cases of malaria.  The action follows discontinuation of quinidine, the only FDA-approved intravenous (IV) antimalarial drug in the United States.

Devout parents who are worried about vaccines often object to ingredients from pigs or fetuses. But the leaders of major faiths have examined these fears and still vigorously endorse vaccination.

Ghana’s long unsung health tech sector is getting global validation with two of its most promising startups being named among five winners for one of the most prestigious social enterprise awards in the world.

Environmental Health

Dozens of cities across the world have declared a climate emergency. Now, students behind the school climate strikes are bringing the movement to Switzerland and Germany. But what does that mean exactly?

Equity & Disparities

Sometimes it is important to go back to basics. For human interaction, one of the basics is language, the system of communication that, when applied at its best, allows us to understand each other, share, cooperate, and pull each other towards a better place. When on a collective journey towards a common objective such as the Sustainable Development Goals, with a rallying cry of “leaving no one behind” and a central aim of “reaching the furthest behind first”, this system of communication is fundamental to move beyond just the rhetorical: to be truly reached, the furthest one behind will need to understand what she is being told, and most likely, that exchange will have to be done in her own language. That principle should apply to all aspects of development, including global health.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations (UN) would “remain beyond reach” without adequate financing, an International Monetary Fund (IMF) official said.

Women, Maternal, Neonatal & Children’s Health

Anyone following international development is probably familiar with “stunting” — which in nontechnical terms means children being too short for their age. Over the past decade, as the world has focused unprecedented attention on undernutrition, stunting has taken center stage.

Help is needed urgently from the international community to help some 2,500 apparently stateless “foreign children” at a camp for the displaced, in north-east Syria, a top UN official said on Thursday.

Malnutrition is detrimental to the health of children. As a result of malnutrition, a child’s growth can be stunted. Additionally, both brain damage and physical impairments can arise from malnutrition.

Rates of sexual violence in El Salvador rose by a third last year, with the majority of cases involving teenage girls.

Over 19 million children in Bangladesh are vulnerable to the forces of climate change, says a new study released this month (April) by the UNICEF.

Children in some disaster-prone regions are twice as likely to be living in chronic poverty, according to new research.

2019 Membership Engagement Survey Results

Every year, the membership committee conducts a membership engagement survey to help us better understand how we can engage our members and track how we are improving this effort. On February 12th, we sent out a survey to all members over the APHA Connect list-serv. The response rate was 10.44% (n=237) which is a decrease from last year’s 12% response rate.

Of the members who responded, 38% were regular members (full, discounted, or affiliate), 26.6% were students, 22.8% were Early Career Professionals (ECPs), and 12.7% were retired. Almost half of the respondents 46.4%, have been an IH member for less than a year, 29% have been a member for 1 to 3 years, 7.6% of them for over 20 years. The majority (85.2%) indicated that they intend to renew their APHA membership and 89% of them intend to remain with the IH section.

The most common reason listed as the primary reason for joining APHA was: connecting/networking with other professionals (40.5%), followed by professional collaboration with other researchers/professionals (20.7%). About one-third of respondents indicated that they joined to either attend (11.8%) or present (11.4%) or advocate/lobby (11.4%) at the Annual Meeting.

Respondents were asked how easy it is to get involved with Section activities. On a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the most difficult and 5 being the easiest, the percentage of respondents were; 1=6.6% (most difficult), 2=19.7%, 3=42.8%, 4=21%, and 5=10% (easiest). Most (79.5%) of the respondents have never been involved with the section committees or working groups.

A clear majority of survey respondents indicated that they were unaware of the Section’s communications platforms: the section website (65.5%), quarterly newsletter (62%), social media (67%) and APHA Connect (59.4%). A quarter of the respondents are aware of the section website, social media and APHA Connect but do not read. And a quarter of the respondents read the quarterly newsletter regularly. Many of the respondents (71.2%) are interested in using communications platforms to network with other section members and discuss global health research and advocacy programs outside of the Annual Meeting. Most of the respondents (81.7%) are also interested in attending regional meet-up event outside of the Annual Meeting.

Members were asked to indicate if they were interested in learning more about the Section’s committees and working groups and to provide their e-mail address so they can be contacted by our committees with information on how to get involved. Committees that generated the most interest among respondents were Policy/Advocacy (71.2%), Program (31.9%), Student (24.5%) and Mentorship (31.3%). Working groups with the largest number of interested respondents included Global Health Connections (70%), Maternal and Child Health (39.5%), Community-Based Primary Health Care (39.5%), and Climate Change and Health (37.9%).

If you have any questions about the survey or have an interest in additional analysis, please feel free to reach out to Jay Nepal or Rose Schenider of the Membership Committee.

It’s National Public Health Week!

From the National Public Health Week Website: http://www.nphw.org/

We hope you’ll take advantage of all National Public Health Week 2019 has to offer as we celebrate public health and highlight key issues. During these seven days of inspiring events, conversations and celebrations nationwide, don’t miss:

  • Our annual Twitter chat, a conversation with public health leaders from around the country. Mark your calendar for April 3, and don’t forget to RSVP.
  • The NPHW Forum on April 1 featuring grassroots organizers sharing how they’ve activated their communities to improve health right where they live. You can register to attend in person or watch the event via webcast.
  • NPHW’s Student Day discussion on April 4, when public health professionals will share tips on how to break into the field. You can join us in D.C. or watch the webcast to ask questions about getting that first job out of school.
  • Our Shareables page featuring images you can post on social media and NPHW logos to help you spread the word about NPHW 2019.
  • NPHW events in your community, from fundraising fitness walks to health fairs to educational workshops. You can search by state on our Events page.

Our fact sheets are available year-round on the NPHW website so we can keep the momentum and learning going. Learn more about this year’s daily themes and how you can be part of the movement for science, action and health.

Why do we celebrate National Public Health Week? APHA Executive Director Georges Benjamin explains that perfectly in his NPHW 2019 Welcome Letter.

Read the inaugural issue of the IH Section’s Climate Change and Health Newsletter!

The IH CC&H Working Group is pleased to share our first newsletter.

We plan to publish every other month and will highlight cutting edge best health practices in climate change.  It will also spotlight our IH members engaged in adaptation and mitigation practices with links to internationally focused resources.  The IHCC&WG newsletter will update readers on our progress on the country specific inventory of programs of NGOs, governments and donors engaged in climate change and health adaptation in developing countries.

Please take a few moments and fill out our survey to help us better disseminate information regarding climate change: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfp-FZEi0DRU44PLD0ukLF2DxJbj5IwfKXYG6pY15kq5HCubg/viewform.

For additional information contact the IH CC&H WG at ihsection.cch@gmail.com

Kaiser Family Foundation releases budget summary analyzing global health-related funding in FY20 budget request

KFF released a budget summary analyzing global health-related funding contained in the FY20 budget request. The analysis includes a table that compares U.S. global health funding in the FY20 request to the FY19 request and enacted levels. It will be updated as more information becomes available.

https://http://www.kff.org/news-summary/white-house-releases-fy20-budget-request/