Global Health Weekly News Round-up

  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) joins the World Health Organization to recognize the World Hepatitis Day July 27.

Politics and Policies:

  • Obama administration announces ground-breaking public-private partnership to prevent health care fraud. It is designed to share information and best practices in order to improve detection and prevent payment of fraudulent health care billings.
  • Doctors petition for limits on painkillers. They have urged the FDA to curtail the overuse and abuse of prescription painkillers by changing the labeling directions on how and when physicians should prescribe them.
  • African health experts- policy makers, advocates and researchers are meeting in Kampala, Uganda to reaffirm national and regional commitments to achieving Millennium Development Goal (MGD) 5, to ensure the health of girls and women become a regional priority.
  • A number of public health organizations in South Africa have extended their support for the amendments on the Tobacco Products Control Act which is meant to support the non-smokers.
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new inhaled drug for the treatment of the lung disease COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease).
  • According to congressional budget office Supreme Court health care law leaves 3 million more uninsured.
  • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will award inpatient rehabilitation facilities $140 million increase in Medicaid payments under the IRF prospective payment system in fiscal year 2013.
  • Singapore ratifies ILO (International Labor Organization) framework for occupational health and safety.
  • The Australian Health Department wants to outsource its operational and management responsibilities for the personally controlled e-health record system to a single provider.

Programs

  • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services awarded Colorado Health Insurance Cooperative Inc. a $69.4 million loan to launch a Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan in Colorado.
  • Hospitals in Iowa provided $1.4 billion community benefits (health screenings, support groups etc.) in 2011.
  • $6.1 Million “Innovation Grant” awarded to test comprehensive care physician model.
  • Bungoma (Kenya) Hospital project hit by row.
  • In Sierra Leone, youth want a review of abortion law.
  • Energy, health care dominates agenda on the eve of Canada’s annual summer summit.

Research

  • A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine revealed that adult mortality rates fell after three states (New York, Maine, Arizona) Medicaid expansions.
  • Study finds drop in death rate in states that follow lines of Obama health law.
  • A new technique uses PET/CT imaging with a compound called choline (F-Flourocholine) to help doctors to detect prostate cancer earlier.
  • Trial signals major milestone in hunt for new TB drugs.  The results presented at the 2012 International AIDS Conference reveal progress in the pursuit of an antiretroviral- compatible TB treatment for the patients with TB/HIV co-infection.
  • The results of a study of HIV treatment policies in 23 countries show that governments have made improvements to get better antiretroviral treatment (ART) to more people but implementation of innovative community-based strategies is lagging behind.
  • According to study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, lung function may decline slower in smokers with sufficient vitamin D levels as compared to smokers who are vitamin D deficient.
  • A study shows that people with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are 2.6 times more prone to developing cancer.
  • A study shows that inactivity puts 1 in 3 adults at risk for disease.
  • According to a study some people are more physically active may be due to their genetic predisposition while evolutionary factors and the obesity, might also play a role in it.
  • Researchers have identified various successful and promising interventions to improve the opportunities for regular physical activity. Promoting exercise and community events through mass media campaigns as well as decision prompts and signage to motivate people are among the few identified as successful examples.
  • A study shows new way of delivering anti-scarring drug reduces the need for repeat injections by 40 percent. This process reduces post-surgical scarring of glaucoma patients.
  • Study shows that information and communication technologies could be an effective way of encouraging millions of people worldwide to become more physically active.
  • A paper in the Lancet says physical inactivity should be recognized as a pandemic.
  • Researchers have found that the drug resistant HIV is on rise in Africa.
  • Study suggests that short, cumulative exercise sessions are beneficial for health especially for maintaining a healthy blood pressure.

Diseases & Disasters

  • An earthquake of 3.8 magnitude hit Los Angeles on July, 25, 2012.
  • Five infant deaths signal serious whooping cough outbreak in UK.
  • According to the Ugandan health officials, about 14 people in western Uganda have been killed by the infection with the deadly Ebola virus. There is no cure or vaccine for the treatment or prevention from this deadly infection in Uganda. National emergency task force has been set up to prevent the spread of disease.
  • The typhoid outbreak in Zimbabwe is suspected to be caused by the consumption of contaminated water.
  • Mysterious nodding disease afflicts young Ugandans.
  • Whooping Cough epidemic in Washington State.
  • World Health Organization has expressed its concerns over the rise in cholera cases in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo amid clashes between the armed groups and government.

 

 

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • Supreme Court upholds President Obama’s health-care law.
  • South Africa adopts 2.5 micron meter (PM 2.5) ambient air quality standards to maintain public health.
  • Indian government proposes new health mission with a focus on the health challenges of people in towns and cities.
  • For uninsured in Texas, Supreme Court ruling adds to uncertainty.
  • Some GOP-led states plan to resist health care law, as ruling reins in Medicaid expansion.
  • Ottawa earmarks $238M for health data research.

Programs

  • The Bank Windhoek Cancer Apple Project sold a total of 87400 apples and raised N$1.3 million for the Cancer Association of Namibia (CAN).
  • Swim across America raises $400K for cancer research.
  • The Prem Rawat (TPRF) Foundation has awarded US$20,000 to cover the costs of a garden-installation program in challenged Niger. These gardens provide fresh produce for the school children lunch.
  • The Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF), with financial support of the government of Canada begins 5-year $2million healthcare program that will focus on preventing HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis among pregnant women in the Ngqushwa district of the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
  • The International Youth Fellowship (IYF) has launched 2012 World Youth Camp in Accra. The aim behind it is make the youth stay away from acts that might lead to violence and conflicts during the coming elections. It will include free medical screening and lectures.
  • A polio campaign from June 29 to July 1 in Lunda Norte Province (Angola) is estimated to vaccinate about 250,000 children from ages 0 to 5.
  • Looking at the health and safety problems of the children, Nestle, Africa vows action on coca child labor in Ivory Coast.
  • Equatorial Guinea offers food aid to Somali famine victims.
  • Workshop on malaria control under way in Ethiopia. This year’s National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) Best Practice Sharing Workshop will acknowledge the progress made in managing malaria (particularly at community level).
  • Global action for healthy communities without illicit drugs theme marked the celebrations of International Day against drug abuse and illicit drug trafficking in Gambia.
  • ‘Love the Gambia foundation’ donated medical equipment’s worth £150,000 to the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Gambia.
  • A team of IBM experts presented a plan to the Kenyan Ministry of Health and the United States Embassy in Kenya to encourage more women to request screening for cervical cancer.
  • Ghana to give USD1m to tackle neglected endemic tropical diseases in order to protect the gains made by the country in Guinea Worm eradication and the elimination of trachoma.
  • Uganda Red Cross Society seeks Sh4.5 Billion for Budada district to provide the people with sanitation kits, hygiene kits, latrine slabs, and safe clean water and sanitize them to prevent any disease outbreaks like diarrhea and dysentery.
  • “Neighbors’ eye” program in Rwanda to help eradicating drug abuse.
  • Hong Kong’s first anti-cancer drug (for liver cancer) granted with US FDA IND.
  • Nepal gets $8 million from UN peace building fund. This funding will used for the activities such as mobile health camps, health services inside the cantonments.
  • Cordillera (Philippines) administrative region children to receive free rotavirus vaccination.
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Children with Intestinal and Liver Disorders (CH.I.L.D) create Canadian Children Inflammatory Bowel Disease Network.

Research

  • A study published in Lancet describes a treatment option for the people living with HIV/AIDS. The quad pill includes an integrase inhibitor, which is meant to stop the virus from replicating.
  • A study published in the Journal of AIDS confirms that the Shang Ring is safe to use and demonstrates that men should exceed the recommended timing for removing the device. This requires only one visit for the procedure and it stays in place for 7 days after the procedure.
  • According to a recent study the pregnant women in Lilongwe and Malawi need to be informed of their increased risk for HIV and the importance of using condoms throughout pregnancy and the postpartum.
  • A study conducted by the New Zealand’s Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) has found that children’s intake of iodine has significantly improved since the mandatory bread fortification policy.
  • A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Department of Biological Sciences and Mechanobiology Institute have discovered how a drug – Lead compound- can deprive cancer cells of energy and stop them from growing tumor. This drug-lead compound is named BPTES.
  • According to a study, expectant mothers who dealt with the strain of a hurricane or major tropical storm passing nearby during their pregnancy had children who were at elevated risk of abnormal health conditions at birth.

Diseases & Disasters

  • Strong earthquake (of magnitude 6.6) rocks China’s far-western frontier. About 34 people are reported to be injured.
  • Earthquake of 3.4 magnitude strikes Morgan Hill about 12 miles from San Martin and 15 miles from San Jose City Hall.
  • Household air pollution in Laos fuels pneumonia. A report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Development Programme (UNDP) noted that 1,200 of the 1,777 deaths could be directly attributed to solid fuel use.
  • Floods by the water of river Brahmaputra in the state of Assam (India) has caused death of 35 people. 11 lakh people are left stranded.
  • 350,000 marooned in flooding of river Brahmaputra in Bangladesh.
  • The Ministry of Health (Singapore) said microspordial spores are common in Singapore soil.

 

 

 

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • 9/11 health fund given clearance to cover cancer.
  • Arizona tries to keep reins tight as it starts regulating medical marijuana.
  • Hospitals will now be ranked by letter grade for how well they perform on safety measures.

Programs:

  • The Coca-Cola Foundation awarded US$26million in grants to 85 community organizations during the first quarter- $9.7 million for water stewardship, $3.6million for fitness and nutrition, $7.4 million for education and $4.9 million for community recycling and other local priorities such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, youth development and civic initiatives.
  • UK announces extra £10m drought aid for West Africa. It will fund nutritional treatment, water and sanitation for a further 31,000 children and food for a further 170,000 people for six months.
  • Starwood Hotels and Resorts launches associate fundraising campaign- ‘Road to Awareness’ to support UNICEF education project- Early Childhood Care and Education program-  in Ethiopia.
  • National strategy launched in Zimbabwe to prevent pediatric HIV/ AIDS.
  • New Give2Asia Fiscal sponsorship partners deliver critical services to children in Bangladesh and Cambodia.
  • The Ministry of Health and Population (Nepal) has established community health units at 22 VDCs of 22 districts to facilitate easy access to health services. They have named the program ‘Village Clinic Program’.
  • A nationwide anti-drugs campaign has been launched by the Nepal police in collaboration with a non-governmental organization, NARCONON, to fight against illegal use of drugs to grassroots level across country.
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine creator Prof. Frazer honored.

Research:

  • A recent study by the health protection surveillance center showed that about 30% Irish population with HIV do not know that they are suffering from this deadly disease. According to the patient campaigners people are still involved in risk taking behaviors because they do not know that these can lead them to get the HIV infection.
  • The researchers that found that the cancer cells have significantly low rate of mutation. Their study shows that increased cancer is the result of a decrease in reactive oxygen species-mediated mtDNA damage.
  • A study indicates a need to develop a rapid point –of-care test to diagnose acute HIV infection.
  • A study gives an insight on how small number of patients (known as elite controllers or long-term non-progressors) infected with HIV virus are able to prevent it from multiply.
  • New diabetes treatment in late testing stage shows promise. Studies show Degludec reduced low blood sugar during the night when it’s most dangerous, by 36% and also reduced severe hypoglycemia significantly. Since this drug is active in body for more than 24 hours for long-acting insulin, patients can maintain good sugar control even if they don’t take it at the same time every day.
  • A latest research shows that Victoza (liraglutide injection) provided greater reductions in HbA1c compared to exenatide and DPP-4 inhibitors, weight loss and cost-effectiveness, when used in routine primary care.
  • Researchers identify unusual ‘altruistic’ stem cell behavior with possible link to cancer. Their study has shown that certain human embryonic stem cells, in times of stress, produce molecules that not only benefit themselves, but also help nearby cells to survive.
  • A study hints that the children and even the grandchildren of old people may get a health benefit because of their old age. The research is based on telomeres- tips of the ends of the chromosomes. It also confirmed the idea that the older your dad was when you were born, the longer telomeres tend to be.
  • Researchers have found specific groups of cells that HPV targets. It has shown that if those cells are removed from the cervix they did not appear to regenerate. These cells also have a particular gene expression that is the same as found in aggressive cervical tumors that allow the doctors to differentiate benign lesions from dangerous pre-cancers.
  • A team of investigators from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSDM) researchers in corporation with Pavlov State University investigated nondisclosure of HIV infection in a cohort of 700 people living with HIV in St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • The New England Journal of Medicine has published efficacy results of Otsuka’s (Pharmaceutical Company) Delamanid for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.
  • A University of Alberta team has made an important breakthrough in the race to find a viable replacement for the supply of technetium-99m, an important isotope for imaging.
  • According to a population based study, Q fever and pneumonia are associated with areas of high livestock density.
  • CT scans warning after study claims too many could lead to brain tumor. Research says children under 15 could face tumors or leukemia’s in later life if they have three or more scans.
  • Studies find no increase in cancer risk from insulin Glargine.
  • Study debunks belief insulin puts people with diabetes at risk of heart disease. strokes and cancer.
  • A study showed that dieting craze in Sweden is linked to cholesterol increase putting the people at increased risk heart disease.
  • New skin patch kills most common form of skin cancer. The treatment called a phosphorus-32 skin patch, a radiation spot-treatment in the form of patch that can safely and easily kill skin tumors with a few easy outpatients’ appointments.
  • Scientists find a new genetic path to deadly diarrheal disease (caused by bacterium Shigella).
  • Study reveals that patients with type-2 diabetes lose weight, decrease insulin in meal replacement therapy.
  • CDC study finds Alabama teens top the teen obesity list.

Diseases and Disasters:

  • An earthquake measuring a magnitude 5.4 struck the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan on Monday morning followed by a 5.7 quake. Scores of people feared dead in this earthquake.
  • Critical situation’ as untreatable gonorrhea accounted for almost 10% of cases in Europe. The ‘Superbug’ strains which are becoming untreatable accounted for almost one in 10 cases of the sexually transmitted disease in Europe in 2010, more than double the rate of the year before.
  • Deadly African sleeping sickness (Trypansoniasis) blamed on witchcraft and demonic possession. Most affected country has been Democratic Republic of Congo, which declared 500 new cases in 2010.
  • Rural Zambia’s drinking supply fraught with danger and disease.
  • In last five months a total of 56 people have died due to dengue in Sri Lanka. According to the ministry the cases have tripled in the first quarter of this year as compared to 2011.
  • In China, one in ten tuberculosis cases are drug-resistant.

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • House rejects bill to ban sex-selective abortions. It was a measure that sought to impose fines and prison terms on doctors who perform abortions on women who are trying to select the gender of their offspring.
  • The Agriculture department (US) has announced that it would expand testing for E.coli in raw beef trimmings.
  • California announces intent to award four medi-cal contracts to health net of California subsidiary.
  • Wolk’s flu bill passes Senate moves to assembly. This bill would require hospitals and clinics to reach a 90% vaccination rate among their health-care workers by 2015 or adopt masking requirement for those who decline flu shots.
  • Federal disability law does not cover medical marijuana patients. A panel of the appeals court threw out the patient’s lawsuit, which had charged that some California cities were violating the ADA by shuttering medical marijuana dispensaries.
  • Medical marijuana is legal in Connecticut. A law has been signed by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy approving its use, a measure that includes strict regulations in an attempt to any avoid problems. Qualifying patients and their primary caregivers would be able to possess a combined one-month supply of marijuana.
  • A ban that would impose a 16 ounce limit on any sugary bottled or fountain drinks that contain more than 25 calories per 8 ounces in New city restaurants, delis and movie theaters was proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Programs:

  • World Health Organization (WHO) award for reproductive health was given out at the 65th World Health Assembly in Geneva.  It was awarded to four countries- Rwanda, Nepal, Malawi, Ethiopia and Yemen.
  • Norway will provide up to NOK 500 million over a five year period for health in developing countries, which will be used to help women and babies through childbirth and the critical first 24 hours after delivery.
  • The first pilot waste water treatment plant with integrated wood production opened in Mongolia. It is funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF): Model region Mongolia (MoMo) project.

 Research

  • According to a recent study, people suffering from pneumonia with high blood sugar level are at a greater risk of death. The team found that those with diabetes had highest risk (14%) followed by those with hyperglycemia not diabetes (10%) and those without diabetes and normal glucose levels had lowest rates (3%).
  • In a recent study, researchers found that taking common painkillers might reduce chances of getting skin cancer.
  • Consumption of oil rich Mediterranean foods such as fish and sea food helps to improve physical and mental well-being.
  • Global research team yields new health insights into different types of trans fats. The findings strengthen the evidence that unlike industrial Trans fats, natural trans fats produced by ruminant animals are not harmful and have an health enhancing potential.
  • Soon a breath test will help to detect deadly tuberculosis bacteria in 6 minutes. However the doctors say that it cannot replace the sputum test which will remain the gold standard.
  • Researchers from Melbourne’s Burnet Institute said that reducing the prevalence of the disease among the drug users could also lead to a drop in infections across the wider populations.
  • Breakthrough drug may extend life of women suffering from deadly breast cancer. According to the daily mail newspaper it could be available in Britain within a year if it passes regulatory checks.
  • According to a research released last week, a drug already approved for prostate cancer has been shown to slow the spread of advance forms of this disease. In the patients treated with drug, the cancer did not worsen for 16 months as compared to 8.3 months in the group that did not receive this drug.
  • Premature babies are 4.5 times more likely to suffer from severe mental health problems. The study reveals that those born after just seven months in the womb or earlier are at highest risk compared with full-term babies.
  • According to a recent study a link between poor asthma control and eczema was seen among Brazilian urban children.
  • A study indicates that allergies (specifically allergies to plants, grass and trees) are linked to higher cancer risk. The researchers say that these allergies cause inflammation which may lead to an overactive immune system- and that over activity can in turn lead to blood cancer.

Diseases & Disasters

  • 6.6 magnitude earthquake strikes Panama’s pacific coast. There are no reports of injuries or deaths and no tsunami is expected.
  • A strong earth tremor of 5.1 magnitude hit northern Italy on Sunday. This area was struck by the deadly quakes in the last two weeks.
  • Measles outbreak in west Cork concerns Irish health officials. The Health Service Executive (HSE) is advising patients to vaccinate their children against viral disease.
  • Tuberculosis infected beef sold in Edo (Benin). On inspection it was seen that it has nodular lesions which enveloped on the surface of the various organs of the slaughtered cow.
  • A new strain of flu is likely to spread through Australia. It is likely to replace swine flu that emerged in 2009. Flu shots are available for people aged 65 and older, pregnant women, people with chronic disease as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Bird flu found in 21 poultry farms out of 85 in Bangladesh this year.
  • Hong Kong officials have confirmed H5N1 strain of avian influenza. They have confirmed it being the first human case of bird flu since November 2010 in Hong Kong.
  • Greek crisis spurs epidemic of suicides and mental illness.
  • New Mexico man is the first human plague case in the U.S. this year. The department of health press release has confirmed that the man is infected with Yersinia pestis.

 

 

 

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • U.S. task force has issued blood pressure guidelines.
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gives less-expensive option, approves first generation versions of Plavix (blood thinners).
  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has ordered forbidding the state dental board to restrict non-dentists from the teeth whitening services in Richmond, Va. According to AMA this decision might change medical practice regulation.
  • U.S. says Medicaid overpaid $ 700 M to New York State.
  • Missouri legislators have agreed to compromise on the debate over insurance coverage of contraception, abortion and sterilization.
  • The FDA advisory committees have endorsed two new HIV drugs and an arthritis drug.
  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services has announced a two-year pay boost for the primary care physicians who treat Medicaid patients.
  • According to the guidelines released on Wednesday, states should submit  details to the Federal government by November 16th on how they will run online insurance market places.
  • The ESC guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure developed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) in collaboration with the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC was launched at the Heart Failure Congress 2012, 19-22 May, in Belgrade, Serbia. These are published in the European Heart Journal.
  • The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CIFA) is warning the public not to consume the Gills Onion brand Fresh Diced Red Onions because the product might be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.
  • As a part of e-health initiatives to improve primary health services in rural and underdeveloped areas, the union health ministry of India has given Rs 18.878 crore to states to facilitate establishment of Telemedicine network.

Programs

  • The Parsons Foundation gives $5million to fight HIV/AIDS in Arizona.
  • UAE school children to learn the benefits of milk in a month-long nationwide campaign. It will target first-grade students.
  • The CMS innovation center awarded 26 grants to a variety of healthcare organizations. The purpose is to improve the healthcare delivery.
  • The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) disclosed that its Philippines office has raised $28.5 M funds in the year till date. This money will be used to promote reproductive and maternal health- one of the country’s Millennium Development Goals.

Research

  • According to a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, people who have bachelor’s degree or higher live about nine years longer than those who don’t graduate from the high school.
  • Besides urinary tract health benefits, a new study confirmed Cranberry’s benefits in boosting body’s immunity. The study also showed that consuming its juice significantly increased the levels of an important antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD).
  • A study indicates that the artificial sweeteners might cause inflammatory bowel disease.  They contain saccharin and sucralose which decrease the gut bacteria and weaken and destroy the gut barrier.
  • A research study found genes which connect football, military and Alzheimer’s disease together.
  • Chilean berry (maqui berry) extract might help to fight type-2 diabetes. The study shows that the anthocyanin’s- delphinidin 3-sambobioside-5-glucoside (D3S5G)-demonstrated insulin-like effects in muscles and liver cells in mice.
  • A study demonstrates the long-term effectiveness of a classroom-based prevention program targeting teen drug use. This study tracked teens that participated in the Bolvin Life Skills Training (LST) program as 7th graders and found that their participation in this program produced long lasting reduction in drug use 12 years later.
  • A study reveals that the healthcare law would save consumers nearly $300 per year. The research says that the saving will be even greater for the people between ages of 55 and 64.
  • According to a new governmental analysis, the foods which come under category of non-healthy food are more costly than the healthy food.
  • According to an 18-month long study conducted by the Rand Corp, about 96% of restaurant entrees exceed United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) limits for calories, sodium, fat and saturated fat.
  • Healthy dieting in pregnancy may be helpful. Study reveals that up to 40% of women gain more than the recommended weight during pregnancy. This excess weight is associated with a number of problems.
  • According to a study, mental distraction can help in relieving pain. The findings show that this isn’t just a mental process, but also physical mechanism that reduces the amount of pain signals travelling from the spinal cord to the brain.
  • An analysis done by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reveal the rate of current cigarette use among the U.S. teens decreased from nearly 12 percent in 2004 to about 8 percent in 2010.
  • A study indicates a possible risk between certain sunscreens use and chances of development of endometriosis. The chemicals known as benzophenone-type UV filters not only protect the skin from UV rays but they are easily absorbed into the blood stream and mimic the effects of the female hormone estrogen.
  • A study examining the sleeping behaviors of the parents whose children suffer from epilepsy say that they often lose sleep over child’s epilepsy.
  • A new U.S. study finds that government workplace safety inspections reduce on-the-job injuries and related costs without hurting company profits.
  • A study done on mice show that though it’s important what we eat but also when we eat. The scientists suggest eating too many hours a day may also contribute to obesity.
  • Harvard university researchers say that the bad fat may affect brain memory.

 

Diseases & Disasters

  • A moderate earthquake rattled an area in east Texas on May 17th. It had a magnitude of 4.3.
  • A maginitude-6.2 earthquake shook down walls and knocked out electricity in parts of far-northern Chile on Monday, May 14th, 2012.
  • Cluster of Influenza A cases in Castle Peak Hospital in Hong Kong.
  • Kenya is facing BCG vaccine shortage.
  • The water supply to tens of thousands of households near Tokyo was cut off on Saturday after local checks found it was contaminated with cancer causing chemical- Formaldehyde. A contamination of 0.2000 milligrams of formaldehyde per liter – more than two times the 0.80 milligram national limit- was detected.