IH News Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • The government of Australia is preparing to soon offer a 20-minute HIV test in Melbourne. It has yet to decide which clinics will offer the test.
  • The National Population Commission has announced that China has planned to improve county-level family planning services.
  • Regulations have been issued by the government of Indonesia to bear graphic photographic warnings on the cigarette packets.
  • The United Nations has allowed Bolivia to return to the United Nations main anti-narcotics treaty and has given its approval on chewing the coca leaf.
  • Twelve nations have signed a new United Nations treaty which aims to counter the illegal tobacco trade.
  • New York City (U.S.) hospitals will adopt new guidelines that will forbid emergency room doctors to give out more than three days’ worth opioid painkillers to the patients.

Programs:

  • Pfizer Inc. has included its pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to expand its pediatric immunization program in Tanzania.
  • UNICEF calls for cessation of child recruitment in the Central African Republic. More than 300,000 children have been affected by the violence which has led to their limited access to education and health facilities.
  • US$176 million announced by IMF and World Bank for debt relief for the Union of the Comoros. It will help the country to fight poverty and improve health and education facilities.
  • European Union gives EUR 16million support to Ghana. This money will support the implementation of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Accelerated Framework and Country Action Plan developed to combat maternal mortality.
  • $25 million has been awarded by Abt Associates for a three-year malaria prevention project in Kenya.
  • The FCC has launched $400 million heath care development fund with an aim to create and expand telemedicine networks.

Research:

  • According to a study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry there is a relationship between mental health and spirituality.
  • According to the Journal of Infectious Diseases, nosocomial transmission responsible for XDR-TB outbreak in South Africa.
  • A study identifies the chances of infection (co-infection) with another disease when a person is infected with a disease.
  • A study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery Pediatrics, climate can be the reason for a neurological condition, hydrocephalus in children in Uganda.
  • Number of new annual cases of HIV/AIDS cases in India has dropped by 57 percent in the last decade.
  • A study published in J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry links loneliness with higher chances of dementia or memory loss.
  • Researchers have identified role in obesity and diabetes. They have found that blocking the expression of gene TRIP-B2r  in mice protects them against obesity and insulin resistance.
  • A report published by Natural News states that children who are vaccinated according to the CDC recommended schedule are five times more likely to develop diseases as compared those who are not.
  • According to the findings of a report, among all rich countries, people of U.S.  live unhealthy and shorter lives.

Diseases and Disasters:

  • The Flu has surpassed an ‘epidemic’ threshold in the United States. It is widespread in all except the three states of US.
  • According to The New Times survey, there is a severe drug shortage in Kigali hospitals (in Rwanda).
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) yellow fever has killed about 171 people in Darfur (Sudan).
  • Top U.N. Aid officials warn food crisis in two isolated southern states of Sudan. People of South Kordofan and Blue Nile have been feared dying of malnutrition and disease.
  • According to the officials, about 80 people have died in Bangladesh due to cold-related diseases like respiratory problems, pneumonia and cough.
  • People in Beijing have been warned of extremely hazardous air quality. The density of PM2.5 particulates has reached 700 micrograms per cubic meter in many parts of city.
  • Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Health has warned the public of possible outbreak of Leptospirosis (rat fever) in flood affected areas.
  • According to the health authorities, Barbados has recorded an increase in dengue cases since the last year.
  • Paraguay has confirmed reports of outbreaks of dengue in the north and east of the country. It has declared a national epidemics alert.

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • The Obama administration has given conditional approval to health insurance market places being set up by six states led by Democratic governors.
  • New Jersey Assembly panel passes a bill allowing driver’s licenses to include diabetic condition.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) has set a standard in the middle of the range of 11- 13 micrograms per cubic meter for the soot particles in the air.
  • Michigan works to ban synthetic drug phenethylamine.

Programs:

  • The United Nations (UN) has asked for $8.5 billion to deliver urgent humanitarian aid to 51 million people in crisis-stricken countries around the world in 2013.
  • The U N has launched an initiative to help to eliminate cholera in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.
  • Emergency vaccinations campaign has been organized in Sudan by its Federal Ministry of Health against mosquito- borne yellow fever.
  • Third phase of measles and rubella (MR) vaccination campaign has been started in Nepal.
  • The UN has warned that nearly 55 million tons of radioactive waste from old Soviet-era uranium mines in unsecured sites in northern Tajikistan.
  • The state of Iowa is planning to spend $3.2 million on tobacco prevention and cessation.
  • MidMichigan Health receives grant to fight childhood obesity.

Research:

  • A Sudanese neurologist has succeeded in giving the first clinical and psychological description of spastic paraplegia.
  • Researchers at the University of California and the University of Oxford have found a link between type-2 diabetes and corn syrup consumption.
  • A study published in Lancet states that air pollution tops the list of major health risk among the developing countries.
  • A study finds years living with disease and injury increasing globally.
  • In a study done by the researchers in United Kingdom, they found a link between the foliate consumption and risk of developing breast cancer.
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given approval for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia Chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • According to a study about 10% of the 6- 8 year old children of Finland have sleep – disordered breathing.
  • Experts say “plethora” of diseases caused by low vitamin D.
  • A study links work place bullying to developing risk for anxiety/ depression/ psychological problems.
  • A study done by the U.S. researcher’s show that Blacks have higher risk of heart disease.  They have a double risk of dying of coronary disease.
  • A study links drinking coffee with reduction in risk of throat and mouth cancer. It states that drinking more than four cups of coffee can cause significant rate of risk reduction.
  • Researchers at University of Copenhagen have found a very important function of BRCA2 gene. This knowledge could be used for the treatment of breast cancer.
  • A 2010 study states that the television in bedrooms may boost heart disease and diabetes among the children.
  • A study links innate immunity and inflammation pathway with advanced prostate cancer risk.

 Diseases and Disasters:

  • Outbreak of diarrhea killed seven people from lower Shabelle region in Southern Somalia.
  • A report released by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that Alaska ranks number one in United States for Chlamydia.
  • Seventh death due to fungal meningitis has been  reported in Indiana (U.S.).
  • A report released by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that Louisiana leads the nation in rates of gonorrhea and syphilis cases.
  • Drug resistant infection cluster has been reported in South Dakota. People who are healthy are not at risk as compared to those on ventilators, urinary or intravenous catheters or long courses of certain antibiotics.

 

 

 

 

IH News Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies

  • The Obama administration on Tuesday defined the “essential health benefits” that must be offered to most Americans and by allowing employers to offer bigger financial rewards to employees who quit smoking or adopt healthy behaviors.

Programs

  • In the 62nd WHO Regional Committee for Africa session in Luanda, Angola, the World Health Organization (WHO) has presented its updated health promotion strategy for Africa.
  • The first unrefrigerated vaccine, MenAfriVac vaccine against meningitis has been approved in Africa.
  • According to the International Status Report released in the Conference of Parties to the WHO Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (FCTC), health warnings in cigarette packets in India only cover 40% of the front face of the packet.

Research

  • According to the researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services the Obama health care reform could provide more than a million women in the U.S. with access to potentially lifesaving tests for breast and cervical cancer.
  • Scientists are working on small pox vaccine to treat the deadly liver cancer.
  • According to the reports released by the United Nations (UN), deaths from HIV/ AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa have dropped down by 32% in the last seven years.
  • A study reveals that malnourished, stunted growth children are growing into obese adults in Africa.
  • According to a study published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine, increase in suicide in the United States between 2000 and 2010 is attributable to increase in hanging/ suffocation that too has increased among the people aged between 45- 59 years.
  • A study links between unemployment and heart attack risk.
  • A study indicates link between a child having a happy teenage and his/ her chances of having a wealthier adulthood.
  • According to a study published in the journal Nature, compounds inhibiting protein synthesis or by utilizing the gene therapy targeting neuroligins in rats, scientists at the McGill University and the University of Montreal have created new hope for treatment / understanding of autism spectrum disorders.
  • According to a study published in the journal Radiology concussions may cause brain disruption.
  • Researchers in Australia are very close to treating a hereditary disease, dilated cardiomyopathy.
  • Experts say that the lifestyle of people of Mexico has led to having a diabetes disaster in that country.
  • According to the researchers malaria vaccine is only 30% effective in infants in preventing them getting this deadly disease.
  • According to the researcher’s key to feeling younger is to keep smart phones, watching reality television shows and beating younger relatives at games.
  • Scientists in Canada have linked “Happy gene” to “Fat gene”.
  • According to a study, up to 20% under the 65s liver disease death has risen in England due to high levels of drinking and obesity.
  • Scientists have found a link between the drug used to treat Psoriasis inflammation and reduction in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease.
  • According to the scientists at London, smoking rots the brain by damaging memory, learning and reasoning.
  • A study reveals that one in every ten children in California, U.S. is uninsured. This is higher than the national average.
  • A group of Indian and U.S. scientists in their study have predicted hidden epidemic of neurological disability for people of India.

Diseases and Disasters

  • According to the Germany’s national health institute, a patient from Qatar has been confirmed being infected with a new type of coronavirus. He has severe respiratory problems.
  • Dengue cases on rise in India.
  • Second death has been reported due to Corona virus.
  • Large amount of spores of Lichen forming Trechelomonas algae responsible for the red rain in some parts of Sri Lanka.
  • About 1000 students of a school in Sri Lanka have been hospitalized following some allergic reaction.

 

 

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • The White House has ruled that young immigrants who will be allowed to stay in the United States as a part of a new federal policy will not be eligible for health insurance coverage under President Obama’s health care overhaul.
  • Japan is preparing for an increase in tobacco prices to seventy five percent more than the present.
  • China is planning to cut the prices of 95 cancer, immunology and blood related drugs by about 17 percent to reduce the growing number of chronic, age-related diseases in the country and make health care affordable.

Programs:

  • The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announces 2013 Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Premium rates.
  • The Red Cross calls for funds to halt cholera epidemic in Sierra Leone.
  • Cuba launches its first nanopharmacetical drug- a tweaked variety of cyclosporine to help to prevent transplant rejection.

Research:

  • According to the Australian researchers more pregnant women are being diagnosed with some form of cancer. They said that this could either me due to increased mother’s age which increased the possibility of cancer or due to increased interaction with health services during the pregnancy.
  • A study has warned that the U.S. obesity rates will be soared by the year 2030. This will increase the burden of illness and also their health care cost and decrease the productivity.
  • According to a study there is a link between obese pregnant women with sleep apnea and chances of their neonates having this problem.
  • A paper published in the journal Genetics says that compiling large amount of data into useful information for the patients and doctors will help to make them better decisions by knowing the possibility or likelihood of developing / passing along a hereditary  disease. It will make a better sense of genome data using informatics approach.
  • According to the scientist the females who undergo radiation therapy for the cure of cancer have their DNA‘s damaged. This causes two proteins PUMA and NOXA, to trigger the death of cells causing early menopause. Blocking the action of these two proteins will help to prevent infertility in the females undergoing chemotherapy.
  • The scientists at the Harvard School of public health say that the people who consume two or more sugary drink per day have increased chances of developing obesity.
  • According to a study published in the journal Science, newly formed memories can be erased from the human brain.
  • According to the recommendations by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants should be given to the sexually active adolescents as a reliable method of birth control.
  • According to a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, females who are on high antioxidant diet like fruits and vegetables have reduced risk of developing a heart attack.
  • The scientists at UCLA AIDS institute have discovered that variation in progression of speed of HIV in people vary due to the killer T-immune response that occur early on during this infection. It targets an epitope called IW9 on HIV protein.
  • A study done by the Mayo Clinic Arizona has showed that the spilt-dose preparation technique for colonoscopy has improved the polyp detection rates, precancerous rates, overall quality of preparation and colonoscopy completion rates.
  • A recent study has shown that the efficacy of drugs for treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s and obesity can be boosted by the nanoparticles to target the mitochondria- the power house of the cell.
  • According to a study published in the journal Lancet, the child mortality rates in Niger (one of the world’s poorest countries) have declined nearly fifty percent over the last decade.
  • DNA barcoding will help to authenticate the natural products. It allows the scientists to use short standardized regions of genetic material to identify the species and compare them to reference genetic sequences.
  • According to a report published in Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, the increasing demand to move personalized medicine research forward is fueling the growth of biobanking market.
  • In Botswana vinegar swab is being used to prevent cervical cancer. Pap smear method to diagnose the disease is not possible at times due to lack of laboratories and other facilities.
  • According to a study done by a group of British and Australian researchers the toxic venom of snake can be modified to provide benefit to an organism. The scientists are trying to explore if this discovery can help to find cure for cancer and diabetes.
  • A microscopically thin film made up of hydroxyapatite can prevent caries and will make the teeth look brighter.
  • A study done by the researchers show that the patients and their relative abuse doctors.
  • According to a consumer group, children should avoid consuming too much of canned tuna fish to avoid mercury poisoning.
  • According to a study children exposed to high levels of mercury increase their chances of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • According to Spanish study kid’s score higher in developmental tests if their mothers get enough vitamin D during pregnancy.

Diseases and Disasters:

  • According to the Consumer Reports, the FDA, and the attorney General for the state of Illinois, arsenic levels are reported high in rice.
  • Hundreds of children in North India have been infected with Japanese Encephalitis.
  • Flood situation has deteriorated in North Eastern India.
  • Flood in Cameroon have killed 30 people and affected at least 26,000.
  • Kane County Health Department (Illinois) is conducting a food-borne illness investigation into six cases of Salmonella that are linked to Aliano’s Ristorante in downtown Batavia.
  • Singapore sees more haze, air quality reduced.
  • Kroger (US) has recalled spinach in 15 states to avoid the selling of Listeria-tainted product.
  • A public health alert have been issued by Department of agriculture’s Food Safety and inspection Service (FSIS) for boneless beef trim products imported from Canada that might be contaminated with E.coli O157:H7.

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • The Health Protection Agency (HPA) (England) has warned heroin users that the drug may be contaminated with anthrax spores.
  • The New York health board approves ban on large sodas. It is a move to combat obesity and encourage people to live healthier lifestyles.
  • New circumcision law by the state of New York to prevent the spread of Herpes infection to the child.
  • Norway upholds ban to display of tobacco products in shops as a measure to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Programs:

  • Early childhood health projects by PATH, in South Africa and Mozambique is funded by a donation of R200m by BHP Billi4on.
  • A memorandum of Understanding was signed by Apollo Hospitals with AfroIndia Medical Services to set up 30 telemedicine units in East and West Africa.
  • UC Davis center to fight child obesity in Latinos.  $4.8 million study funded by U.S. Department of Agriculture aims at identifying effective approaches to combat this growing problem among them.

Research:

  • According to a study nicotine not only in cigarettes but in nicotine replacement products like gum or patches harms sperm.
  • A study found that South African wine is good for heart. It protects against heart attack by reducing cell death and increasing contractility of heart.
  • A survey shows that about two thirds of men in Indonesia above the age of fifteen years smoke. It also revealed that large numbers of people are also exposed to the second hand smoke in work, home and in public places.
  • According to a study, mothers of Mexican origin are more nurturing than white females.
  • According to a charity drink related harm costs Scotland’s councils £2bn annually. The figures are based in Scottish government data.
  • A research study showed that lung transplant approval rates depend on the socioeconomic status of people.
  • According to the researchers at the University of Kentucky academic success of Latino immigrants is dependent on the school teachers and its climate.
  • In a study done by Cornell University researchers it was found that parents immigrants status affect their access to care and hence their children’s health.
  • A study published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism states that swim training with healthy diet play a crucial role in fighting against cancer.
  • A research done by University of Michigan Medical School showed that it is possible for the people who are not able to smell things will be able to do so by gene therapy.
  • Massachusetts engineers have found a way to increase the permeability of skin to drugs using the ultrasound waves.
  • According to a study analgesics commonly used to relieve pain may cause hearing loss in females.
  • According to the researchers at Seoul National University in South Korea, Er:YAG laser microjet transdermal device could replace needle jab.
  • According to a study job strain might affect cardiovascular health.
  • A study showed that acupuncture works for head and neck pain, osteoarthritis and chronic headaches.
  • According to World Socialist Web Site UK politicians gain from privatizing National Health Service.
  • Scientists find insulin sensitivity gene, may lead to new diabetes treatments.
  • Scientists in Ohio have created artificial memory in brain tissue, in vitro for the first time.
  • According to a study, intrauterine exposure of nicotine either passive or active might affect the neurobehavioral development of infants.
  • A study showed that the Electronic Health Records Data (EHR) for research is often incomplete, inaccurate and unreliable.
  • A study found that peanut allergies are rising among the people of developed nations.
  • A study showed that healthy diet and lifestyle not only affects the growth of a tumor but also its metastasis.
  • A study found that traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom can help to cure cancer.

Diseases and Disasters:

  • Chinese health authorities are investigating whether children were tested for genetically modified (GMO) rice as a part of a Sino-U.S. research project.
  • Chicken pox outbreak reported in South Malawi (Africa). The health authorities have instructed to close schools to prevent the spread of this disease.
  • KwaZulu Natal (South Africa) Department of Health in crises.
  • Nearly half of Indonesians live without sanitation, clean water. Country’s health minister says it requires $5.9 Billion USD to improve access to sanitation and clean water.
  • The National Food Health, Safety and Quality Service (Mexico) said that the country’s poultry farmers slaughtered 22.3 million birds between June and August to stop the outbreak of avian flu.
  • Nepali workers in Malaysian palm industry face health risk caused by pesticides. They spray it without using any safety equipment’s.
  • The staff work in emergency department at Forth Valley Royal Hospital in Lambert (Scotland).
  • Eight infants were exposed to tuberculosis in a hospital in California. According to the health officials it’s unlikely that they will contact the disease.
  • Tewksbury’s West Nile Virus risk rose to ‘High’ by Massachusetts.
  • Superbug kills 7th person in Maryland National Institute of Health Clinical Center.