Scaling Up Climate Services: Lessons from East Africa, Adaptation Community Meeting, July 20

Effectively scaling up climate services requires solid investment in observations, usable climate data, the development of demand–driven products, and the tools to use processed data. One-off climate service pilots are important to test new ideas, but a more strategic approach is needed to reach scale.

USAID/Kenya and East Africa’s Planning for Resilience in East Africa through Policy, Adaptation, Research and Economic Development (PREPARED) Project brought together key partners including national meteorological and hydrological services (NHMS), the IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Center (ICPAC), FEWS NET/USGS, and Tetra Tech to develop demand-driven tools to develop and improve East African climate services.

This month’s Adaptation Community Meeting will highlight the experience working with these partners, which has included the development of improved climate data sets and products with national meteorological services while also establishing user interface processes in multiple sectors and with multiple applications to maximize uptake and use.

Registration deadline: Jul 20, 2017
Date: Jul 20, 2017 4:00PM to 5:30PM EDT

Speaker

John Parker is a water resources management specialist, currently serving as Deputy Director of USAID’s Sustainable Water Partnership. Previous roles have included Senior Technical Advisor of USAID/East Africa’s PREPARED Program, Team Leader for a Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment in Honduras, and Deputy Director for a regional USAID watershed management program in Central America. He has led research on water resources management, climate change adaptation and food security, and has published in leading journals, including World Development, Food Security, and Water International. He is a graduate of Tufts University’s interdisciplinary Water Program and holds dual graduate degrees from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Location

Chemonics International, Inc.
1717 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20006

Detailed directions are available at: http://www.chemonics.com/Pages/Contact-Us.aspx

To join remotely:
Online webinar – https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1307385679763801858

Internship Opportunity with the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Wilson Center

The Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program is looking for the Fall 2017 class of interns, who will be based at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC. The application closes this Sunday, July 16th.

Since 1994, the Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP) has actively pursued the connections between the environment, health, population, development, conflict, and security. ECSP brings together scholars, policymakers, media, and practitioners through events, research, publications, multimedia content, and an award-winning blog, New Security Beat.

The Environmental Change and Security Program is seeking interns to:

– Write for their award-winning blog, New Security Beat
– Network with leading experts in the environment, development, and security
– Work closely with the friendly, dynamic “Green Team” at the Wilson Center

Assignments may include:

– Researching and writing stories for New Security Beat and ECSP’s website
– Assisting with events and conferences
– Researching environment, security, development, global health, and demography topics
– Assisting the preparation of publications and/or outreach materials
– Performing administrative assignments in support of ECSP activities

Requirements

Potential interns should be students, prospective students (within the next year), and/or recent graduates (within the last year) with an interest in, coursework related to, and/or experience working on environmental and human security.

In addition, applicants should:

– Possess strong research, writing, and/or administrative skills
– Be detail-oriented
– Be able to work both independently and as part of a group

ECSP currently offers unpaid internships. They are looking for candidates who are willing to devote at least 21 hours per week, up to a maximum of 35 hours per week. Interns work seven hour days.

For the full description, list of qualifications, and instructions on how to apply, please see the Wilson Center website:
https://www.wilsoncenter.org/opportunity/internships-the-environmental-change-and-security-program

APHA releases statement: Decision to withdraw from climate agreement is a disaster for public health

APHA Executive Director Dr. Georges Benjamin has released a statement regarding President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.


Decision to withdraw from climate agreement is a disaster for public health

Statement from Georges Benjamin, MD, Executive Director, American Public Health Association

Washington, D.C., June 1, 2017 — “President Donald Trump’s decision today to renege on U.S. commitments to fighting climate change and withdraw from the Paris Agreement has disastrous consequences for human health.

“The climate accord, which establishes a long-term framework to reduce carbon emissions among more than 190 nations, marks a historic step toward addressing one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. As a leading emitter of greenhouse gases, U.S. participation and leadership is critical to reaching target global reductions and minimizing health threats.

“This administration has already taken significant steps to roll back progress we’ve made in addressing climate change. Today’s reckless decision is further abdication of leadership at the federal level to protect public health. But our work on climate change will not be stopped. Today’s announcement underscores the importance of continued action at the state and local level to address this threat.

“The science is clear. Climate change is happening and it’s affecting our health. A changing climate affects our food supply, the spread of infectious disease, our water systems and air quality, and much more. All have significant impacts on human health.

“We will continue our efforts to educate, advocate and mobilize action around this critical public health challenge. We have designated 2017 as the Year of Climate Change and Health and the APHA 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo will focus on climate change and health in November.”

# # #
The American Public Health Association champions the health of all people and all communities. We strengthen the public health profession. We speak out for public health issues and policies backed by science. We are the only organization that influences federal policy, has a 145-year perspective and brings together members from all fields of public health. Visit www.apha.org.

For more information, please contact David Fouse, 202-777-2501.

 

New World Bank Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) – ‘From Climate Science to Action’ starting May 8, 2017

The World Bank Group is offering a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on climate change – ‘From Climate Science to Action’ – starting May 8th 2017.

The new course presents the most recent scientific evidence on climate change. It explores different strategies for low emission and climate resilient development, and provides an overview to the Paris Agreement ratification with some reflections on COP22 outcomes. Through interactive video talks, complimented with curated readings, resources and quizzes, renowned scientists and policy makers from the field will lead you through the course. An active discussion forum on the course would further enhance learning where participants get to exchange knowledge with peers from across the globe. As the course concludes, you will be invited to reflect on what you can do at the national, local, community, and individual level to limit global warming below 2°C and adapt the impacts already occurring.

You can audit video lectures and some course content for free. If you want to complete the course and earn a Course Certificate by submitting assignments for a grade, you can purchase the course for a small fee. Financial aid is available if you cannot afford the course fee.

Workload: 3-6 hours/ week

Register for this four week course here.

#D4CA Challenge: UN Global Pulse calls for research proposals to analyze business data to combat #climatechange

Note: This was cross-posted to my own blog.


Rose Schneider, chair of the IH Section’s Climate Change & Health Working Group, shared this information about the Data for Climate Action challenge. It’s an initiative by the UN’s Global Pulse to recruit researchers and data scientists to “leverage private big data to identify revolutionary new approaches to climate mitigation and adaptation” – that is, use corporate datasets, which have been de-identified and made available by participating companies, for projects or analyses that “generate innovative climate solutions.” According to the press release:

Data for Climate Action will target three areas relevant to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal on climate action (SDG 13): climate mitigation, climate adaptation, and the linkages between climate change and the broader 2030 Agenda.

The challenge aims to generate original research papers and tools that demonstrate how data-driven innovation can inform on-the-ground solutions and transform efforts to fight climate change. It builds upon the model of data science competitions pioneered by organizations like Kaggle, and company-specific initiatives to share big data for the public good, such as the “Data for Development” challenges hosted by Orange.

Researchers who are selected to participate in Data for Climate Action will have four months to conduct their research. A diverse panel of experts in climate change and data science will evaluate final submissions based on their methodology, relevance, and potential impact. Winners will be announced in November of 2017.

The data being offered includes retail transaction data, social media posts, meteorological and air quality data, and user-generated data on road conditions. Data sets can be combined with each other or with other publicly available datasets like those featured on Data is Plural. Individuals or teams can submit proposals, and the only apparent requirement is that all participants be at least 18 years old.

They’ve apparently extended the deadline from April 10th to the 17th, so any analysts or programmers who aspire to code for the public good still have ten days to get their applications together and apply.