Event Invitation: Taking the Pulse of the Expanded Mexico City Policy, 10/19

Posted on behalf of Laura Altobelli, IH Section Chair

Here is an opportunity to hear early research findings on application of Trump’s expanded Global Gag Rule on reproductive health as well as HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis in 7 countries.

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The Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE), Human Rights Watch (HRW), and the International Women’s Health Coalition (IWHC) in cooperation with Senator Blumenthal and Senator Shaheen

We invite you to a briefing:

Taking the Pulse of the Expanded Mexico City Policy

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2017

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

CAPITOL VISITORS CENTER, SVC209

First St NE, Washington, D.C. 20515

Refreshments served. Space is limited. RSVP to Annerieke Smaak (asmaak@genderhealth.org).

The Trump Administration’s “Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance” policy, also known as the global gag rule, is currently due for a six-month review. This expansion and re-branding of the “Mexico City Policy” encompasses all global health assistance, including funds to fight HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Expert speakers will share new research findings on the early impacts of this policy in Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. They will also shed light on how previous versions of the policy relate to abortion rates, maternal mortality, and other areas of global health.

Speakers:

Bergen Cooper, Director of Policy Research, Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE)

Vanessa Rios, Program Officer, International Women’s Health Coalition (IWHC)

Skye Wheeler, Emergencies Researcher, Women’s Rights, Human Rights Watch (HRW)

Moderator – Nina Besser Doorley, Senior Program Officer, IWHC

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CSIS Event and Virtual Webcast: Careers in Global Development, October 4th

Center for Strategic and International Studies and the Project on U.S. Leadership in Development cordially invite you to:

Careers in Global Development

To get more information and to register, click here.

Date: Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Time: 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. ET

Location: CSIS Headquarters, 1616 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

Virtual webcast available

Featuring

Gregory Gottlieb

Director of the Feinstein International Center at the Friedman School of Nutrition & Policy, Tufts University

Moderated by

Ambassador William Garvelink

Senior Adviser
Project on U.S. Leadership in Development, CSIS

“Careers in Global Development” is a monthly series featuring U.S. senior-level, multilateral and NGO officials who have worked in the field of development for at least twenty years. The series is aimed at young professionals who are interested in working in development and will include a one-hour dialogue on both the specific expertise of the speaker, as well as the career path and influences along the way. It will focus on specific areas of interest, including the role of humanitarian assistance in development and U.S. foreign policy; development as a tool to counter violent extremism; and sectoral issues such as food security, health, and education.

This session features Greg Gottlieb, recently appointed Director of the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University.  Throughout his distinguished career, Greg has worked to improve food security, humanitarian, and transition programs. Most recently Greg served as the Acting Assistant Administrator for the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID/DCHA). Prior to that, he served as the Senior Deputy Assistant Administrator for DCHA. Since he began with USAID in 1988, he has held a variety of other positions, including Mission Director in Pakistan and Namibia, Senior Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Bureau of Food Security (helping to plan and implement the Obama Administration’s Feed the Future Program), as well as posts in Malawi, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Kenya. Greg earned a bachelor’s degree from Humboldt State University, a Juris Doctor from Loyola Law School, and a Master’s in Public Policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

Please note that RSVP is NOT necessary should you be attending the virtual webcast. 

IHSC career development webinar recording “En Route from the Ebola Tent to Congress” now available

The APHA International Health Student Committee hosted a webinar called “En Route from the Ebola Tent to Congress” on September 27, 2017 with Deborah Wilson, RN and MPH candidate at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Debbie led an interactive webinar walking attendees through a day in the life of an Ebola Treatment Center, including a bit about the political fallout upon returning to the USA, and how her experiences shifted her from direct patient care to public health policy.

If you have any questions, please email: apha.ihsc.careers@gmail.com

Don’t miss the Community-Based Primary Health Care Pre-Conference this year: Saturday, November 4th!

Community-Based Primary Health Care and Community Health Workers: Underfunded Afterthought or Key to Achieving Universal Health  Care? 

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In 1978 the WHO’s Declaration of Alma-Ata outlined CBPHC as the strategy for achieving universal healthcare, with health being defined as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” Almost forty years later, we are far from achieving “health for all.” Despite accumulated evidence in the literature demonstrating the effectiveness of CBPHC and CHWs for increasing health equity, why is this strategy often either an underfunded afterthought, or left out to favor “sexier” vertical interventions like mosquito nets for all, or hospital care?

In this interactive workshop, participants will share their own expertise as well as develop new knowledge and understanding about issues with global experts in CBPHC and CHWs. Conference topics will include: 1) Review of the latest evidence on the effectiveness of CBPHC as a strategy to achieving health equity, 2) Debate on the pros and cons of vertical, horizontal and diagonal approaches to achieving universal health, 3) Sharing of resources for the implementation of CBPHC, 4) Case studies on effective global CBPHC programming 5)Community based participatory research (CBPR) and its relevance to CBPHC and 6) Global funding for CBPHC. This workshop is sponsored by the CBPHC working group of the international health section.

Speakers include: Stanley Foster, Henry Perry and Nina Wallerstein!

 Here is the link to the CBPHC website where you can register, share information, and put this pre-conference on your calendar for Saturday, November 4th!

Please share this Save the Date information for the CBPHC Pre-conference widely as well as the link to the CBPHC Pre-Conference titled:

Community Based Primary Health Care and Community Health Workers: Underfunded Afterthought or Key to Achieving Universal Health Care?

Here is the link to purchase the ticket for the pre-conference that you can share.

Facebook event has been created for the workshop and will be continually updated and used as a platform for advertisement. If you are active on Facebook, please mark that you are “Going”, share the event, and invite your Facebook friends.

Adaptation Community Meeting 9/21: Climate Change and Health in Mozambique – Impacts and Responses

Remarkable progress is being made across Sub-Saharan Africa on public health. Child mortality, rates of stunting and incidence of diseases such as malaria and meningitis are dropping. But these gains may be lost as changes in climate and weather promote disease outbreaks and greater food insecurity. Owing to its location, demographics and geography, Mozambique is particularly vulnerable to negative outcomes on health resulting from changes in climate. Malaria is already widespread and poor water supply and sanitation infrastructure lead to frequent contamination of water resources during floods.

Over the past few years, the USAID-funded Climate Change Adaptation, Thought Leadership and Assessments (ATLAS) project has been examining the relationship between temperature and rainfall trends and diarrheal disease and malaria rates in Mozambique.

At the September Adaptation Community Meeting, Climate Vulnerability and Adaptation Specialist Fernanda Zermoglio will provide the latest research and findings from this work, as well as what is being done to strengthen Mozambique’s health system preparedness and response.

Thursday, September 21, 2017
4:00 pm – 5:30 pm ET

Location:
Chemonics International, Inc.
1717 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20006

To join remotely:
Online webinar – https://meet93445775.adobeconnect.com/september2017/
*If it is your first time using Adobe Connect please allow for up to 15 minutes for the plug-in to download before you can join the webinar.

For more details and registration, click here.

Speaker:
Fernanda Zermoglio has been on the forefront of climate change adaptation science, assessment methodology, programming and policy for the past 15+ years. A geographer with a detailed knowledge of climate modeling and various adaptation methodologies, she has synthesized applied research, pragmatic tools and knowledge-sharing platforms to inform the design, implementation and integration of climate adaptation assessments across a number of countries, in support of various donors and local governments. Since 2014 she has been the Climate Vulnerability and Adaptation Specialist on the DC-based ATLAS project.

Check out the Adaptation Community Meetings page on Climatelinks to find: 1) information on upcoming meetings, 2) recordings of previous meetings organized by category and 3) post-event blogs.