Perspectives on Global Health from Pharmacists Around the World, Part 3

As healthcare continues to morph and adapt based on the requirements of kind, compassionate, evidence-based care, pharmacists are playing a vital role in ensuring patient’s needs are met in countless regions across the earth. In this four-part IH Blog series, the pharmacy role accompanied by profession-related challenges and pharmacist-led global health initiatives will be explored within a profession that is often underappreciated. The following perspectives, shared by practicing pharmacy professionals from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), India, Cambodia, and the United States of America (USA) aim at highlighting various aspects of healthcare that should be properly addressed by governmental bodies, NGOs, and all stakeholders by both sustainable political will and empowering solutions. 

This third segment focuses on local and global pharmacist roles in each of these areas and the thoughts that pharmacists from these respective nation states have been willing to share with IH Connect.

Healthcare systems across the globe are unceasingly identifying novel approaches for health professionals to fulfill. The traditional roles that physicians, nurses, and other allied health workers performed in the past have metamorphosed as patient-care management is altered to effectively accompany patients. A few illustrations include: one of the most prominent international non-governmental organizations (INGO), Partners In Health, has a nurse – Sheila Davis – as it’s CEO contrasting a physician fulfilling this position; physician assistants and nurse practitioners being heavily utilized as primary care providers; and the introduction of community health outreach specialists as vital patient resources. The vocation of a pharmacist, in particular, has been altered significantly depending on the area of the world one inhabits. The majority of humanity believe that pharmacists are those who solely dispense medications, but several regions on the earth have realized the benefit of incorporating pharmacists in direct patient management, treatment guideline development, and even directors of ministries of health. Regardless of the development of pharmacy in a country, this healthcare profession is a key to kind, compassionate patient-centered care. The following commentaries from the United States of America, India, United Arab Emirates, and Cambodia explore the profession of pharmacy both locally and internationally while exposing initiatives to improve global health through pharmacists.  

 Dr. Moeung Sotheara, Ph.D. 

Clinical Research Assistant & Part Time Lecturer – University of Health Sciences

Phnom Penh, Cambodia 

In Cambodia, a large proportion of pharmacists work in community pharmacy, pharmaceutical enterprises and hospital pharmacy. However, there is still an insufficient presence of pharmacists in each area. In community pharmacy in particular, the inadequate presence of pharmacists is due to the current system of “name renting”, a legacy of post-war public health policy in response to the shortage of healthcare professionals. In such a system, any person having minimum knowledge in medicine dispensing and having been trained by the Ministry of Health for a specific period of time can “rent” a pharmacist’s name to apply for a pharmacy permit. Nevertheless, despite the growing number of pharmacists owning a pharmacy in recent years, the pharmacists’ role remains the traditional product-oriented functions of dispensing and distributing medicines and health supplies. In other words, pharmacists are still viewed as “simple medicine sellers” by the public. As the country develops and medicine consumption has increased, the pharmacist’s services in community as well as in hospital pharmacy must shift from medication dispensing to a focus on safe and effective medication use to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Pharmacists must assert themselves as medication experts and play a more active role in patient counseling and promoting the rational use of medicine. In addition, pharmacists must also be actively involved in public health. The functions of public health that can benefit from pharmacists’ expertise may include disaster preparedness, immunizations, preventive health measures and educating other healthcare providers about various techniques of prescribing medications and issues related to the drug use process.

Transitioning the discussion to global health, pharmacists have unique skill sets and assets that put them in a prime position to collaborate with members of the health care team to address global health issues and challenges. However, there is limited information on the role of the pharmacist in this field. There are 3 areas pharmacists can play in global health in the future: global health practice and program delivery, global health research, and global health policy. In the area of global health practice and program delivery, pharmacists can serve an important role on the health care team in under-served countries by helping address barriers to the delivery of care due to their knowledge of drug products, storage requirements, dispensing requirements, and logistics of pharmacy operations. They can improve clinical outcomes through patient-centered services such as glucose monitoring and blood pressure management, and also potentially work with local and national health organizations to help develop global health programs based on successful interventions made locally in the community. In the area of global health research, pharmacists who are affiliated with a university that has a focus on this area can assess global health projects and research initiatives to determine if opportunities exist for pharmacy to get involved and to add new dimensions to existing global health research. Finally, the outcomes of global health research often stimulate the need for proposing and evaluating global health policy at both the governmental and national level at which pharmacists can lend their expertise. As medication experts, pharmacists routinely exercise their knowledge of the rational use of medications, their cost-effectiveness, and the safety and efficacy of therapeutic regimens. These concepts can be applied domestically toward the development of policies that have global implications.

Nazgul Bashir, B. Pharm

Registered Pharmacist – Super Care Pharmacy

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

The role of the pharmacist varies from region to region and differs in several aspects. While there are areas of this world in which Pharmacists have vital roles in health sectors, there are other parts where pharmacists are given underutilized roles. Pharmacists are scattered throughout the community allowing them to be the most approachable healthcare professional – needing no appointment, no time restrictions and often being available 24 hours. Due to their aforementioned accessibility, their roles should be thoroughly revised, and the public should be made more adequately aware of their significance in communities.

Regarding the regional role of pharmacists in the United Arab Emirates, there was little utilization of pharmacists 10 to 20 years ago. Even now, some locations lack proper utilization due to their role being more product-based selling and dispensing any medication prescribed by the physicians. This occurs even though pharmacists in UAE are available in hospitals, health clinics, community and in retail stores allowing them significant access to patients.

To elaborate on the under-utilization of pharmacists, the current healthcare system typically does not promote pharmacist’s interventions in patient-management. This could include managing the dose of a hypertension agent, discussing change of therapy to more efficiently achieve patient outcomes, and a larger role in discharges from hospitals where pharmacists can provide counseling and follow-up.

Immunization is another role of pharmacists which could make a huge impact. Currently, most of the immunizations in this region are taking place in hospitals and health centers which are handled by nurses and physicians. However, this role can be handed to pharmacists in the community who can bring awareness to communities so that people won’t miss their vaccinations . In particular, many people are not even aware about the importance of flu shots. Pharmacists should be given an equal responsibility in bringing the awareness in a community and assisting people to receive their shots on time and prevent ailments. Counseling on family planning, use of contraception, palliative care, prevention of disease, identifying high-risk patients for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are services not offered in pharmacies. Over-the-counter advice and educating patients on dietary supplements are often performed, but pharmacists are still underutilized overall.

However, the future of pharmacists in UAE look promising as several chain pharmacies make new exceptions in implementing more significant roles for their pharmacists. For example, physicians are advised to use the generic name so that pharmacists can choose to dispense the trade name.Additionally, pharmacists are being advised to minimize the use of antibiotics by making them strictly prescription based thus avoiding unnecessary use of them. Many barriers for increased pharmacist services need to be overcome: lack of time to offer services, shortage of pharmacists, lack of patient demand and low patient acceptance, lack of knowledge and skills, and underestimation of enhanced pharmacy services by physicians. With these barriers in mind, government and health authorities are planning their best and making promising change to bring the best of the pharmacy divisions.

Dr. Bryce Adams, Pharm D., RPh.

Oncology Medical Science Liaison

Washington D.C., United States of America 

Before delving into the role of the pharmacist in the United States, I would like to highlight the Oath of a Pharmacist as this serves as the model of how a pharmacist should view their role:

“I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession’s moral, ethical and legal conduct.
  • I will embrace and advocate changes that improve patient care.
  • I will utilize my knowledge, skills, experiences, and values to prepare the next generation of pharmacists.

I take these vows voluntarily with the full realization of the responsibility with which I am entrusted by the public.”

Currently, the USA is in the midst of a great shift in the pharmacist profession. According to 2017 statistics, 60% of pharmacists in the United States were practicing in retail pharmacies – this includes drug, merchandise, and grocery stores. However, these roles are expected to decrease over the coming years. There are several contributing factors for this decrease – one being a decrease in the price margins per prescription. As pharmacies make less money for each prescription that is filled, businesses have to fill more prescriptions with less staff. This can cause a host of issues, such as having less time to counsel patients, more reliance on technology to catch errors, an increase in likelihood for medication errors, and a more difficult time fulfilling the oath of a pharmacist. Ultimately, this leads to under-utilization of the pharmacist profession by placing less of a value on their role of positively impacting patient care.

Fortunately, pharmacists have been realizing this shift and have been proactive in adapting. They have achieved this by advocating for additional venues to provide value, such as being able to bill for medication therapy management services and administering vaccines. These services are extremely beneficial for patients and also increase revenue for the businesses. While roles in the retail setting are expected to decrease, roles in the hospital and ambulatory care settings are expected to increase. Currently, 30% of pharmacists are in these settings. With an increasingly elderly population, these roles are becoming even more important.

These aforementioned pharmacist provided-services typically utilize this profession in a more productive way by rounding with physicians and helping to inform clinical decisions for specific patients. The rest of pharmacists are scattered across a variety of specialties. Two of these specialties are academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Both of these have more of a global health impact, as academia is training the next wave of professionals who will have an international presence and will impact care while the pharmaceutical industry is developing the next wave of transformative medications that will improve patient care on a global level.

Before I finish, I want to revisit the oath of a pharmacist. As the United States healthcare system is being scrutinized due to the cost, as technology is becoming more utilized, and processes are becoming more automated, pharmacists will need to “embrace and advocate changes that improve patient care.” Pharmacists are in a unique position as the medication experts to greatly impact patient care, and it’s up to this profession to ensure that the right patient gets the right drug at the right dose via the right route at the right time.

Dr. Maneesha Erraboina, PharmD.

International Business Manager – Helics Group Scientific Networks 

Hyderabad, India 

In theory, the role of Indian pharmacists is to dispense medications by adjusting the dose for patients based on their health condition, and they play a major role in the rational use of drugs especially antibiotics. However, in India, it is very difficult to find a pharmacist in clinical hospital settings and none of the medical organizations have pharmacist professionals in the healthcare team. 

According to mainstream Indian psychology, most of the population only accepts medications from physicians rather than another profession, like pharmacists. This is an ongoing trait of Indian citizens that has existed for several years with very few signs of significant change in the future. 

In my own personal experience, I had an opportunity to attend an interview for a pharmacy position; however, the role was not directly related to dispensing medications. Due to the disconnect between the doctorate level education and the available job opportunities, I ended up in another profession within the health arena that wasn’t directly related to my education. Although I feel all PharmD. graduates are in a very good position today, they may need to explore unique opportunities as the profession catches up with the education level. 

In the future, I feel pharmacists could play an active role in the healthcare system as they are meant for patient care. I believe this feeds into having a primary role in clinical hospital settings. In addition, Pharm.D graduates will have other opportunities in clinical and medical research, pharmacovigilance, teaching, and scientific journal publishing companies in India.

In India pharmacists are underutilized in professional pharmacy roles such as a clinical pharmacist. However, in exploring other areas of the health field, Indian pharmacy graduates have taken advantage of their education to influence the global health society. As a personal example, my current role as an international business manager allows me to organize health conferences around the world to advance healthcare. As the pharmacy profession continues to grow and adapt across the globe, I believe one role for pharmacists will be ubiquitous: avoiding the irrational use of drugs to protect patients and improve health outcomes.

Perspectives on Global Health from Pharmacists Around the World, Part Two

As healthcare continues to morph and adapt based on the requirements of kind, compassionate, evidence-based care, pharmacists are playing a vital role in ensuring patients needs are met in countless regions across the earth. In this four-part IH Blog series, the pharmacy role accompanied by profession-related challenges and pharmacist-led global health initiatives will be explored within a profession that is often underappreciated. The following perspectives, shared by practicing pharmacy professionals from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Cambodia, and the United States of America (USA) aim at highlighting various aspects of healthcare that should be properly addressed by governmental bodies, NGOs, and all stakeholders by both sustainable political will and empowering solutions. 

This second installment focuses on medication quality in each of these areas and the thoughts that pharmacists from these respective nation states have been willing to share with IH Connect.

The onset of the biomedical and synthetic medication era brought with it a formerly unknown hope for the betterment of humanity’s health. The introduction of antibiotics like the beta-lactam class, vaccinations to completely eradicate diseases like smallpox, medications with unique mechanisms of action to regulate hypertension and diabetes, and more recently, targeted oncology medications to successfully attack cancer cells have all contributed to vastly improving patient care across the globe. However, with this tremendous advancement, novel complications have arisen that have plagued health care professionals in devastating arenas. For the pharmacy profession, specifically, the quality of medications has emerged as an additional concern in the treatment and dispensing process. Although a majority of nation states have regulatory bodies to monitor the quality of medications, low quality medications frequently find themselves in the hands of patients. This often leads to substandard care, furthers health inequalities, creates distrust in healthcare workers, promotes drug resistance, and damages the solemn promise every health care professional strives to follow – to properly care for those afflicted with various ailments. The perspectives and ideas that are shared in the following text explores medication quality throughout various parts of the world and initiatives that aim at addressing this determintental issue. 

Dr. Moeung Sotheara, Ph.D. 

Clinical Research Assistant & Part Time Lecturer – University of Health Sciences

Phnom Penh, Cambodia 

Access to high-quality medicines in many countries is largely hindered by the rampant circulation of counterfeit and substandard medicines. The use of counterfeit and substandard medicines represents a worldwide public health concern, and its prevalence is particularly high in developing countries. In Cambodia, the Ministry of Health reported in 2001 that 13% of medicines were spurious/falsely labeled/falsified/counterfeit, with 21% being substandard and 50% unregistered.

This crisis affects commonly used lifesaving medicines such as antibiotics, analgesics and anti-parasitics. The impact of poor-quality medicines is enormous ranging from increased adverse effects to increased morbidity and mortality. Poor-quality antimicrobials in particular has led to multi-drug-resistant malaria and bacterial infections which result in a huge burden for the country’s health sector. The high prevalence of poor-quality medicines has possibly contributed to the loss of confidence in health systems and health workers due to repeated treatment failure.

Among the reasons for the high rate of fake drugs in Cambodia are corruption, weak law enforcement, poverty and high sales taxes with self-medicating being often the driving force behind counterfeit drug markets. Counterfeit drugs mostly enter Cambodia through illegal drug outlets. The counterfeiting of drugs in Cambodia usually appears in the form of finished pharmaceuticals imported from neighboring countries, rather than the counterfeiting of bulk drug ingredients. This is due to the country’s lack of manufacturing capacity. Substandard drugs on the other hand are the result of limited implementation of good pharmacy practice regarding the distribution and the storage of pharmaceuticals which results in the deterioration in medicine quality.

Efforts have been made by the Cambodian government to tackle this problem. In 2015, the Cambodia Counter Counterfeit Committee (CCCC) was established and has been in charge of tracking counterfeit and substandard medicines circulating in the country. In 2018, the CCCC confiscated 138 types of illegal goods and substandard medication in 10465 packages from a pharmaceutical company in the capital city, Phnom Penh. The government is also working with its neighbors to decrease the number of fake drugs smuggled across the borders of Southeast Asia. Non-licensed drug outlets have been gradually disappearing, especially in the capital, either due to closure or accreditation, resulting from a strengthening of regulatory efforts. These initiatives are supported by pharmacists in communities by creating a front line against the distribution of counterfeits in the Kingdom through educating the public about the dangers of fake pharmaceuticals. 

Nazgul Bashir, B. Pharm

Registered Pharmacist – Super Care Pharmacy

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Maintaining a healthy environment, reducing the healthcare cost, and using effective treatment options are all linked to medication quality. In any community, city, or region there are countless investments undertaken to improve the quality of healthcare overall. The Institute of Medicine defines health care quality as “ The degree to which healthcare services for individuals and populations increases the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge.”

More specifically, medicine quality has two major roles: patient safety and effectiveness of treatment. Consuming a poor quality medicine will not only increase the risk to patient safety, but will hinder the proper treatment of patient. This can cause a patient to suffer more and increase the cost of treatment. Being a pharmacist and dispensing a low quality medication will also result in losing a patient’s trust. Since pharmacists have the role of dispensing medications, it is vital to ensure the medicine is in highest quality.

Quality of pharmaceutical products, mainly medicines, poses a serious challenge to the entire healthcare sector including drug manufacturers, distributors and dispensing pharmacists. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the influx of fake or counterfeit medicine is a major concern in the market over all the globe.

Medicine in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is manufactured so that medications go through systematic quality checks which are checked and re-checked several times while maintaining records in order to avoid any health hazard, Quality assurance teams then conduct self inspection or hire a third party to undertake inspections. The health regulations make sure that medicine distributed meet the standards of the listed quality and accepted internationally. On the other hand, imported medicines have similar criteria for safety and quality management. 

In order to further address low quality medications, the UAE Ministry of Health unveiled a new machine to detect imported drugs and inspect fake or counterfeit drugs. This machine is known as the TruScan RM Analyzer. It’s high tech detector is used to identify low quality drugs that pose health threats to the community. The device is helpful for chronic disease medicines such as diabetes, heart problems or even cancer drugs. The TruScan RM Analyzer also helps inspection regulators in the country to make informed and timely decisions for the release of drug shipments which are entering the country. In addition, UAE has been fighting the spread of low quality medicines in the country by taking many measures like high quality control labs and research on medicines and healthcare products.

Dr. Bryce Adams, Pharm D., RPh.

Oncology Medical Science Liaison

Washington D.C., United States of America

In the United States, the quality of medications isn’t commonly considered in the process of treating a patient. This is because of laws and regulations that are in place to ensure the quality of the medication. However, this wasn’t always the case. Up until 1906, there was no law requiring medications to be pure. That changed in 1906 with the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act. This required medications to be labeled correctly and to meet purity standards put forth by the United States Pharmacopeia. 

This act greatly improved the quality of medications produced in the United States as manufacturers were required to list the ingredients that are used in the creation of medicine, and the ingredients and manufacturing process must meet certain standards. However, there is still a market for counterfeit medications as patients search for ways to reduce the cost of medications. It is estimated that 19 million US citizens purchase medicine outside of the current regulated system (e.g. from unlicensed sources such as foreign online pharmacies).  One recent example is with counterfeit Avastin, an anticancer drug, that was found to have no active ingredient. Another example is the recent opioid epidemic. Street drugs are being laced with fentanyl leading to increased overdoses and mortality. 

Recently, there have been discussions to allow for greater importation of medications into the United States. While this could potentially reduce the cost of medications, it could also increase the risk of counterfeit medications. Medications originating from outside of the United States makes it harder for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate the quality and purity of medications. 

Patients in the United States can reduce the risk of receiving counterfeit medications by picking up their medications from their local pharmacy and can feel comfortable knowing those medications are of high quality. If cost is an issue, a patient can discuss their options with the pharmacist. There may be a cheaper alternative or an assistance program that can help offset the cost of the medication.

Repurposing Medications: Reimagining Treatment Options

Last month around the Chinese New Year holiday, a prominent Chinese scientist from Guangzhou Medical University made an announcement that stirred controversy both domestically and internationally while also highlighting a route to combat ailments that global academia and pharmaceutical industries have been attracted to for years. The scientist revealed that his team had been injecting patients with a malaria-causing parasite in order to cure a range of cancers – with two patients seeming to have no cancer cells remaining at the site of tumor and five additional patients having no disease progression out of ten total patients receiving this malarial therapy for at least a year. Although this type of treatment has been attempted in the past in an attempt to combat HIV in the 1990s, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other health governing bodies determined that there was insufficient pre-clinical data to justify human trials during this time period. The controversy revolving around this announcement encompasses the aforementioned determination by CDC, the release of trial results before being published in a peer-reviewed journal, and, most importantly, the possibility of creating a malaria public health emergency for a country due to eradicate the communicable disease by 2020. Although the scientist who underwent this study clearly abdicated internationally conferred health principles, this avenue of repurposing – repositioning, re-profiling, re-tasking, etc – medications and therapy is becoming more appealing to those invested in novel treatment options for both established and emerging diseases.

Throughout the development lifecycle of new chemical entity (NCE), the process for regulatory approval could span over ten to fifteen years with an associated cost of over 2 billion dollars. This has led to an average of only 20 to 30 NCEs being approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) each year. However, through repurposing medications, the development span can be cut to five to eight years at approximately 60% of the total NCE cost – in addition to higher approval rates from regulatory agencies. This repurposing process, as shown by the statistics, is enormously appealing for pharmaceutical companies/investors, but also provides targeted therapy for patient’s disease states at a theoretically lower price than an NCE. Even for rare genetic diseases, repurposing has become common due to only 400 medications being on the market to treat over 7000 genetic conditions. Repurposing is accomplished through the theory of translational research which takes a look at basic scientific discoveries and determining how a medication can be made to match this discovery – for example, examining the molecular pathway of diabetes and then matching it with a chemical entity that has an effect within the pathway like glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The known chemical entities are commonly stored in giant databases within academia and the industry. Through big-data analytics, advanced modeling, and high throughput screening techniques, these chemical entities can then be extracted from the databases and determined if it has a possible role in a certain molecular pathway.

This method of establishing novel treatment options ought to be utilized more frequently and effectively, though there are medications over the years that have undergone this type of approval. The following are examples of already approved medications and others undergoing clinical trials:

Approved Repurposed Medications:

  1. Thalidomide, which was originally developed as a racemic mixture of enantiomers for the treatment of morning sickness but found to be teratogenic due to the effect of the (S)-isomer, was later successfully developed by Celgene as a single (R)-isomer product for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma.
  2. Viagra (Pfizer’s sildenafil) was a drug that initially failed as an angina treatment in clinical studies; however, during these trials, its effect on erectile dysfunction was noted and then later approved for this indication.
  3. Celebrex, commonly used in osteoarthritis, works by inhibiting COX-2 receptors. Recently it has been shown that for patients that previously had colon cancer, taking this agent can reduce the risk of additional polyp formation without negative gastrointestinal effects associated with existing treatments.
  4. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which is an acne medication, when combined with traditional chemotherapy, results in complete remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia in 90% of treated patients.
  5. Tamoxifen, a hormone therapy medication, treats metastatic breast cancers, or those that have spread to other parts of the body, in both women and men, and it was originally approved in 1977. Thirty years later, researchers discovered that it also helps people with bipolar disorder by blocking the enzyme PKC, which goes into overdrive during the manic phase of the disorder.
  6. Raloxifene was initially developed to treat osteoporosis, but has since been shown to reduce the risk of invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women in 2007.
  7. Zidovudine (AZT) was initially developed to treat various types of cancer, but was determined to be ineffective. However, it was repurposed into the first approved HIV/AIDs medications in 1987 and has had a tremendous impact on the progression of the autoimmune disorder.

Repurposed Medications Undergoing Clinical Trials:

  1. The lipid soluble simvastatin is currently undergoing a trial in the UK to assess the efficacy of reducing the progression of Parkinson’s disease. The statin drug class is thought to prevent this ailment through its pleiotropic effects including reducing inflammation, reducing oxidative stress, reducing the formation of sticky bundles of alpha-synuclein, and increasing the production of neurotrophic factors. The results are expected to be released in 2020.
  2. Purdue University received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to discover the effectiveness of Ebselen, a chemical entity, against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and auranofin, which is FDA-approved for the treatment of unresponsive rheumatoid arthritis, against Clostridium difficile.
  3. Metformin, a first line agent for many diabetics, has been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer in diabetes patients and is being investigated as a treatment for cancer in many different clinical trials

Although this is certainly not an exhaustible list of the impacts repurposing has had on healthcare, the majority of this repurposing stems from serendipitous observations rather than targeted interventions. Through these unanticipated occurrences, a range of disease states can now be more effectively treated ranging from communicable diseases like HIV/AIDS to mental health ailments including bipolar disorder and Parkinson’s disease to non-communicable diseases. As the rising cost of healthcare continues to devastate humanity and lead to health inequalities, heads of governments, pharmaceutical industries, academia, and nonprofits need to commit themselves into investing their time and resources into this repurposing method. The targeted repurposing interventions are more vital and should be devoted to in order to expand options for health disorders rather than the unexpected observed effects. The financial and health outcomes will lead to novel treatment options accessible to a majority of the world which will allow health care professionals to properly accompany their patients through their disease state.

It’s National Public Health Week!

From the National Public Health Week Website: http://www.nphw.org/

We hope you’ll take advantage of all National Public Health Week 2019 has to offer as we celebrate public health and highlight key issues. During these seven days of inspiring events, conversations and celebrations nationwide, don’t miss:

  • Our annual Twitter chat, a conversation with public health leaders from around the country. Mark your calendar for April 3, and don’t forget to RSVP.
  • The NPHW Forum on April 1 featuring grassroots organizers sharing how they’ve activated their communities to improve health right where they live. You can register to attend in person or watch the event via webcast.
  • NPHW’s Student Day discussion on April 4, when public health professionals will share tips on how to break into the field. You can join us in D.C. or watch the webcast to ask questions about getting that first job out of school.
  • Our Shareables page featuring images you can post on social media and NPHW logos to help you spread the word about NPHW 2019.
  • NPHW events in your community, from fundraising fitness walks to health fairs to educational workshops. You can search by state on our Events page.

Our fact sheets are available year-round on the NPHW website so we can keep the momentum and learning going. Learn more about this year’s daily themes and how you can be part of the movement for science, action and health.

Why do we celebrate National Public Health Week? APHA Executive Director Georges Benjamin explains that perfectly in his NPHW 2019 Welcome Letter.

Kaiser Family Foundation releases budget summary analyzing global health-related funding in FY20 budget request

KFF released a budget summary analyzing global health-related funding contained in the FY20 budget request. The analysis includes a table that compares U.S. global health funding in the FY20 request to the FY19 request and enacted levels. It will be updated as more information becomes available.

https://http://www.kff.org/news-summary/white-house-releases-fy20-budget-request/