Fellowship: Jacaranda Health Maternal Health Fellowship (Nairobi)

Jacaranda Health: Maternal Health Fellowship

Background
Jacaranda Health is a start up social enterprise that aims to set a new a new standard for maternity care in East Africa. We are combining business and clinical innovations to create a self-sustaining and scalable chain of clinics that provide reproductive health services to poor urban women. Our model is a combination of two tightly-integrated services (a) Jacaranda Maternities near the slums where women can go for respectful obstetric care, safe delivery, and postnatal care; and (b) mobile vans that create a direct link with our patients, generate demand and healthy outcomes through antenatal care and birth preparedness. Jacaranda has received awards for its model, and we are also planning to work as an “innovation laboratory” for new approaches in improving maternal health, from outreach and marketing, to low-cost mobile technologies

We are piloting the model in Nairobi with a Jacaranda Maternity and mobile unit. We have just launched our first mobile clinic and are providing services to women in peri-urban Nairobi. We are working quickly to prepare to launch a fixed clinic for deliveries and basic emergency obstetric care.

Job Summary
Jacaranda Health is looking for a medical student or MPH with experience and interest in maternal health to help us develop evidence-based protocols for our new maternity clinic. This is an opportunity for an ambitious student or recent graduate to spend three to six months working with some of the most exciting innovations in maternal health. We have a great team in Nairobi, and good advisors internationally, and would like to have some help from someone who has a combination of a clinical and public health research background

Responsibilities
The Maternal Health Fellow would work with our international clinical advisors, our front-line clinical staff, and our operations manager to help develop a set of clinical protocols that are truly world-class and evidence based. This will require research, compiling protocols from our library of protocols and academic research in maternal health, and vetting them with our clinical staff in the field. We want to take the best practices from maternal health globally and translate it into a set of protocols that provide clear checklists and decision support for our frontline nursing staff. There will also be an opportunity to get involved in other clinical activities, such as systematizing our clinic processes, working with our partners at Harvard School of Public Health on our impact evaluation, and some of the new technologies that Jacaranda is piloting.

Timing
This is a full-time three to six month position, preferably based in Nairobi. Start date as soon as possible: August or September through November. The position is a volunteer fellowship, but Jacaranda can offer a stipend for expenses and housing.

Qualifications

  • MPH or medical resident, with experience working in maternal health, ideally from both a clinical and a research perspective
  • Highly resourceful, independent, and self-starting
  • Demonstrated professional experience and an interest in maternal health
  • Flexible and easy-going enough to work in a fluid, cross-cultural startup environment in Nairobi
  • Ability to communicate findings compellingly to colleagues and advisors
  • Desired: experience working in East Africa

Benefits

  • Opportunity to work with our advisors and partners from obstetricians at Harvard and internationally, to experienced nurses and midwives in Kenya
  • Exposure to all facets of building innovative maternal health organization. You will have a chance to see first hand the clinical, operations, marketing, technology, and business elements that go into building a successful social enterprise
  • Learn about maternity experience and clinical challenges faced by low-income mothers in peri-urban areas
  • Significant responsibility and independence

Additional Comments
Interested candidates may apply by email with an up to date CV and cover letter to jobs@jacarandahealth.org. Please put “Maternal Health Fellowship” in the subject line.

Global Health News Last Week

May 18 was HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.

POLITICS AND POLICY

  • Hundreds of Kenyan AIDS activists held a protest on 18 May in the capital, Nairobi to demand that the government meet its commitment to increase annual health and HIV funding.
  • In response to the mutual expulsion of diplomats, the UK’s DFID announced that it has frozen new aid to Malawi.
  • DDT has made a controversial re-appearance in Uganda.

PROGRAMS

RESEARCH

  • The World Health Organization has just launched a new web-based information resource tool that should be of interest to many in global health and development community, the Global Health Observatory.
  • According to the World Health Organization, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has more than doubled between 1980 and 2008.
  • New research has found that a variant in one gene can lead to a 30 percent lower risk of developing cerebral malaria.
  • A new study from Bangladesh concludes that most of the world’s pregnant women don’t need vitamin A supplements.
  • American scientists have tested a treatment regimen for tuberculosis which will reduce the amount of time it takes to complete the full treatment as compared to current plans.
  • A new report from the Guttmacher Institute finds that that 7 in 10 women in Sub Saharan Africa, south central Asia and south east Asia who want to avoid pregnancy, but are not using modern methods give reasons for non-use which suggest available methods do not fulfill their needs.
  • Average life expectancy across much of the world — except Iraq and South Africa — is steadily climbing and infant deaths dropped across the world during the first decade of the 21st century, according to figures released by the World Health Organization.
  • The Clinton Health Access Initiative and Gates Foundation have teamed up to support research into developing a cheaper version of the drug Tenofovir.

DISEASES AND DISASTERS

  • China has reduced its AIDS mortality by two-thirds since it began distributing free antiretroviral drugs in 2002; however, the improvements were seen largely in patients who acquired HIV through blood transfusion, rather than through sex or drug use. On a darker note, Chinese authorities ordered an AIDS activists’ web site shut down after it had published an open letter from a retired senior official concerning news restrictions placed on a 20th-century public health scandal.
  • Dr. Orin Levine looks at a disturbing global trend: Infectious killers that had been beaten back by aggressive immunization efforts are making a comeback in places long thought to be safe havens.

WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY

The IH Blog was featured in the “Buzzing in the Blogs” section of the Healthy Dose this week! Thanks to Tom Murphy for reading and tweeting us!